Personality Types in Stress

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  • Personality Types in Stress
    • Type A and B
      • Friedman and Rosenman
        • Method
          • 4. Included questions about everyday pressures such as queuing.
          • 5. The interview was designed to make Type A's clear - would speak slowly or turn up late.
          • 3. Personalities assessed by face-to-face interviews.
          • 2. Examined for for signs of Coronary Heart Disease.
          • 1. 300 men from California.
        • Findings
          • 1. After 8 1/2 years they re- approached participants.
          • 2. Found twice as many classified Type As had died of cardiovascular problems.(12%-A, 6%-B)
          • 3. Type A's all had higher blood pressure.
      • Evaluation
        • Ragland and Brand - Follow up Study
          • Found 15% of the men had died.
          • However found no evidence between Type A and Mortality.
        • Myrtek: Meta analysis of 35 studies.
          • Found association between CHD and a component of Type A - Hostility.
        • The interview method made it more reliable.
          • Could evaluate traits rather than questionnaires.
      • Traits
        • Type A
          • Competitive and achievement striving.
          • Impatient and a time urgency.
          • Hostile and aggressive.
        • Type B
          • Easy going.
          • Stress resistant.
          • Patient
          • Relaxed
    • The Hardy Personality
      • Kobassa
        • 1. Asked them to fill out SRRS.
        • 2. 150 participants were high stress, their illness records varied.
        • 3. This suggested there was a third factor - hardyness.
      • Evaluation
        • Research
          • A lot of the research is from self-report techniques.
          • Some studies still lack internal validity.
        • Negative Affectivity
          • Hardyness correlates with NA.
          • 'Hardy' people are just low on NA.
      • Traits
        • Control: Individual in control of their own lives rather than external factors.
        • Commitment: Involved with the world around them - strong sense of purpose.
        • Challenge: Problems are challenges to overcome rather than threats.

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