PARLIAMENTARY LAW MAKING

Tbh this is just for me, its unfinished rn

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  • Parliamentary Law Making
    • Types of Bills
      • Private Bills; intended to affect a particular group
        • EXAMPLE: University College London Act 1996
      • Public Bills; intended to affect the public as a whole
        • Government Bills; steered through parliament by the appropriate government department
          • EXAMPLE: Education Act 2011
        • Private Members Bill; sponsored by an individual MP or peer
          • EXAMPLE: Abortion Act 1967
    • Stages
      • TIMELINE (((((()))))))
    • Parliamentary Supremacy
      • EU Laws take priority over English Laws
      • EXAMPLE: Merchant Shipping Act 1988 - EU disagreed with it so it got scrapped
        • HUMAN RIGHTS ACT 1998
      • RULES: Cannot bind successor, can legislate on any subject matter, cannot be overruled by others, limited by HRA1998
    • Influences
      • Media
        • Many forms; TV, radio, internet
          • EXAMPLE: Daily Mail - often run headlines on immigration
          • CURRENT EXAMPLE: RIGHT TO DIE CAMPAIGN - ON TV
          • EXAMPLE: The Sun - campaigns against change to UK via EU
          • EXAMPLE: 2000 News of the World - Sarah Payne (Know of sex offenders in the area)
        • Advantages
          • Brings attention to major + minor issues
          • Helps pressure groups bring awareness to their issue
          • Coverage of political campaigns on TV, radio and newpapers.
            • CURRENT EXAMPLE: RIGHT TO DIE CAMPAIGN - ON TV
        • Disadvantages
          • Can cause panic by exaggerating stories
            • EXAMPLE: Dangerous Dogs Act 1996
          • Newspapers are owned by a small number of indiviudals who have their own political agenda and can influence others
          • Newspapers can be bribed
          • They can create public opinion instead of reflecting it
      • Pressure Groups
        • Cause Groups
          • Promote a particular idea or belief
            • EXAMPLES: Shelter, Help the Aged, Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth, Fathers 4 Justice
      • Political
        • Governing Party: most seats in parliament, they make the timetable and can (sort of) force whatever bills they want
        • Events: Events such as 9/11 put pressure on the government to make new laws
        • European Union: European Community Law means we have to make our laws compatible with theirs
        • EXAMPLE: 9/11 - Prevention of Terrorism
        • Advantages
          • Because the governing party is elected it means they will respond to public needs quickly
          • Ideas can be thought out fully with experts
          • Flexible with responses
        • Disadvantages
          • GP have the majority in the HoC so they can push bills through
          • They can also just try to be popular - bring in laws we want, not need
            • GP have the majority in the HoC so they can push bills through
          • Emergency Laws can have flaws and loopholes
  • Sectional Groups
    • Further the ends of their own particular society or section
      • EXAMPLES: National Farmers Union, Confederation of British Industry, Law Society, British Medical Association
    • Pressure Groups
      • Cause Groups
        • Promote a particular idea or belief
          • EXAMPLES: Shelter, Help the Aged, Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth, Fathers 4 Justice

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