Nutcracker Accompaniment - Act 2, Scene 6 - Knickerbocker Glory

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: henners2
  • Created on: 03-06-14 20:11
View mindmap
  • Nutcracker Accompaniment - Act 2, Scene 6 - Knickerbocker Glory
    • STRUCTURE
      • At the beginning of the scene the accompaniment is silent, the texture builds up in the middle and gradually declines at the end. The way the accompaniment is structured shows a beginning, middle and end to the scene/dance.
    • MOOD/ATMOSPHERE (and Can be related to character instead of hypnotic mood - see last point)
      • The Scene starts with silence, this leaves the audience waiting with anticipation, especially as the knickerbocker glory enters, smoking, with a smug impression.
        • Secondly, the cello starts to play, it is played in a minor tone (low pitch), the tempo is slow, but constant throughout the scene, it is like a based line. This sets the tone of the scene and starts to create a hypnotic, creepy and enchanting atmosphere.,
          • Thirdly, the Clarinet is introduced, repeating an enchanting sounding melody that adds to the hypnotic mood. The mood reminds you of a snake charmer charming a snake,
            • Furthermore, a melody of strings  starts to play, again, this is repeated throughout the scene and adds to the texture of the music and therefore reinforcing the hypnotic, creepy, enchanting and scary atmosphere.
              • The final addition to the interesting and cleaver texture building of this sections is the intermittent triangle sounds, this again, sounds like a snake, making the atmosphere seem even more creepy and scary.
                • To link this with character instead of mood, you could discuss as the texture builds his character the personality of his character becomes clear - sleazy, controlling and deceitful
                  • Also hypnotic clarinet//strings adds to it more by evoking the idea of a snake charmer, especially when the tambourine comes in - suggesting he is a snake!!
    • ACTIONS AND MUSIC
      • Near the end of the scene there is a break in the musical phrase, and there is a new sound, like the clarinet descaling. This paired with Clara's actions of trying to break free suggests the hypnosis is not working and she seems scared.
      • As the texture of the music starts to build within the scene, the knickerbocker glory's actions become more sexual, for example he gets closer to Clara, he has more hip thrusting movements and actions of puppeteering, so controlling her.
      • As the texture of the music builds Clara's actions become gravitational and the dynamics become sluggish and the relationship shows the knickerbocker glory is starting to control her. The music is enhances the movement and therefore, reinforces the idea of Clara being hypnotised and controlled
        • Untitled
    • GENERAL KNOWLEDGE
      • The music from the ballet was made for the original Nutcracker Ballet, therefore, Matthew Bourne choreographed the dance to the music
        • The music is written by Tchaikovsky and belongs to the Romantic period.
          • The ballet contains some very advanced harmonies and a wealth of melodic invention that had not been seen in ballet music before.
            • He also uses toy instruments during the Christmas Party scene.
              • Tchaikovsky’s score is extremely engaging and the music tells amazing stories with wonderful melodies.
  • At the beginning of the scene the accompaniment is silent, the texture builds up in the middle and gradually declines at the end. The way the accompaniment is structured shows a beginning, middle and end to the scene/dance.
  • STRUCTURE
    • The ballet contains some very advanced harmonies and a wealth of melodic invention that had not been seen in ballet music before.
      • He also uses toy instruments during the Christmas Party scene.
        • Tchaikovsky’s score is extremely engaging and the music tells amazing stories with wonderful melodies.

    Comments

    No comments have yet been made

    Similar Dance resources:

    See all Dance resources »See all GCSE Dance - Nutcracker Accompaniment resources »