Measuring stress

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  • B) 2) Measuring stress
    • Physiological
      • Geer & Maisel
      • Galvanic Skin Response (GSR)
        • Skin conductivity
      • Sweat = stressed
        • Higher skin conductivity = more sweat = more stress
      • Group 2 (predictability) - highest conductivity with onset of tone
      • Group 1 (actual control) - lowest GSR readings
      • Car crash photos
      • Group 1 - ability to terminate stimuli
      • Groups 2 & 3 yolked to G1
      • G2 - told tone preceeds photo
      • G3 - told they would see photos and hear tones (no predictability)
      • 60 NYU undergrads
    • Self reports
      • Kanner
      • Life Events Scale (after 10 months)
      • Morale scale and symptoms list (every month x9)
      • Hassles & Uplifts scale (every month x9)
      • Hassles were consistent month to month
      • Hassles contribute to stress regardless of life events
      • Hassles better predictor of stress than life events
      • 100 from California
    • Combination
      • Johansson
      • Self Reports
        • Mood
        • Caffeine and nicotine consumption
        • High risk stress group reported feeling more irritated and rushed, and had lower wellbeing
      • Physiological
        • Urine samples
          • Testing for adrenaline
            • Higher stress = more adrenaline in urine
          • High risk - first sample was double adrenaline baseline and continued to increase
          • Low stress - peak of 1.5x baseline
          • Baseline sample in morning and 4 times during day
      • Swedish sawmill
      • 14 high risk stress workers - repetitive work
      • 10 low risk - control (maintenance / cleaners)

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