Institutaional aggression

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  • Institutional aggression
    • Within group
      • importation model
        • Irwin and Cressey
          • prisoners bring their own social histories and traits into prisons
          • People who were more aggressive outside of prison will be more aggressive in prison: they are not 'blank states' when they enter prison
      • Gang membership
        • related to violence and other forms of antisocial behaviour
        • studies show that gang membership is the cause of most misconduct
          • DeLisi et al. found a slight positive correlation between gang membership and aggression in prison
        • huff
          • in US people were ten time more likely to commit a murder when in a group
        • Fischer found that isolated gang members decreases serious assaults by 50%
      • Situational factors
        • prisoner or patient aggression is due to stressful or oppressive conditions
          • paterline and Peterson
          • eg crowding which increases fear and frustration
        • staff experience
          • Hodgkinson et al
            • trainee nurses were more likely to suffer violent assaults that experiences nurses
          • due to more mistakes or lack or respect
        • McCorkle found that overcrowding, lack of privacy and lack of meaningful activity increases violence
          • David Wilson
            • set up prison units that were sounded with the radio , view of outside, low temperature
            • virtually eradicated assaults on prison staff
              • real life application
      • 'Pains of imprisonment'
        • deprivations or prisoners can increase aggression
        • loss of liberty, autonomy and loss of security
        • Sykes
          • potential threat to personal security increase anxiety levels
          • some responded with violence against other prisoners and staff
    • Institutional aggression is aggression that occurs within an institution and is motivated by social forces rather than anger or frustration
      • eg in prisons or hospitals
    • Between groups
      • Institution can refer to a whole section of society defined by ethnicity or religion
      • can occur when there is hostility or hatred between two groups
      • Eg the murdering of 6 million jews by the Nazis
        • The nazis wanted to purge everything non-germanic out of germany
        • Staub's process of genocide
          • 1.difficult social conditions
            • treaty of of verssailes crippled Germany
          • 2.less powerful group is blamed for the hardship
            • Jews were doing well economically
          • 3. dehumanisation of target rules
            • all their possessions taken away
          • 4. Moral values and rules become inapplicable and killings begin
            • gas chambers open
          • 5. The passivity of bystanders enhances the process
            • German citizens allowed this to happen
      • dehumanisation
        • humans have moral inhibitions
        • by making victims seem like worthless animals guilt is taken away
      • Obedience to authority
        • Milgram uses the prestigious setting of yale to convince participants to give confederates  harmful electric shock for the sake of the experience
        • 65% went to 450 volts
        • monocausal
          • eg anti- Semitism allows people to Condon the Nazi's actions
  • Gang membership
    • related to violence and other forms of antisocial behaviour
    • studies show that gang membership is the cause of most misconduct
      • DeLisi et al. found a slight positive correlation between gang membership and aggression in prison
    • huff
      • in US people were ten time more likely to commit a murder when in a group
    • Fischer found that isolated gang members decreases serious assaults by 50%

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