Hubris in Greek Tragedy

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  • Hubris in Greek Tragedy
    • Oedipus
      • Likening himself to a God - even the priest calls him out on it
      • Laius' rape of Cyrssipus - MYTH
      • Oedipus "coupling" with his mother - Incest
      • Willing to kill an innocent person: Shepherd
        • Furthermore, he also wants to kill Creon
      • Oedipus is judgemental upon hubristic actions!
        • "He didn't flinch at murder, he'll never flinch at words"
      • Doesn't listen to Tiresias!
        • Calls him a "scheming quack" even though he is a prophet of Apollo!
      • Jocasta encourages him to be hubristic
        • "To look neither left nor right"
    • Antigone
      • Creon not burying the body of Polynikes
        • Due to his harmartia
        • "Nor did I think that you, a mere mortal, could override the gods"
      • Creon commits hubris, Antigone doesn't!
      • The Chorus believe that the burial of the body is "the work of the gods"
      • Ignores the message of Tiresias
        • Tiresias doesn't even need to be summoned!
      • According to the Chorus man should weave in "the laws of the land, and the justice of the gods" - CREON DOESN'T
      • Creon is willing to kill an innocent person: Ismene
        • Stops himself!
      • Inadvertently kills Haemon and Eurydike - their deaths are blamed on him!
    • Medea
      • Backstory is routed in hubris: Medea's killing in Colchis including the murder of Pelias
        • Establishes unsettling characterisation
      • Killing of her children
      • Killing of Glauce and Creon
      • Lack of burial for children by father
      • Revels in her hubris
        • Only way to influence Jason
          • "I have stung your heart"
    • Hippolytus
      • Incentive moment: Hippolytus' pride to pray to Artemis and not Aphrodite
        • "No god who uses the night to work her wonders will ever find favour with me"
      • Theseus' destruction of his Oikos
        • Initial blasé attitude due to his willingness
      • Phaedra's lust for Hippolytus (implanted by Aphrodite)
      • The Nurse's encouragement - perhaps hinting that sometimes sophism can sometimes be considered as hubrisitic
      • Phaedra's suicide


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