Timé in Greek Tragedy

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  • Timé in Greek Tragedy
    • Oedipus
      • Time in what is Oedipus' identity!
        • Makes him change his path from finding Laius' murderer to finding his father!
        • Worries that Jocasta will receive him as a mere "slaves" son
        • The quest for time in his identity leads to his anagnorisis
          • Jocasta "begs" him not to ask any more questions about his identity when she realises
          • The catastrophe occurs when he does not have time in his identity as he is a "man of agony"
    • Antigone
      • Antigone gains time in the burial of Polynikes
        • Honouring both of her brothers - familial time
          • Hence why she dies a "martyr"
        • Hold honour above the state law
      • Creon wants to keep time in his regal title which the Chorus "suppose" he has
        • Both protagonists are faced with the matter of their honour and their respective roles
          • Antigone gains time in the burial of Polynikes
            • Honouring both of her brothers - familial time
              • Hence why she dies a "martyr"
            • Hold honour above the state law
      • "Even if I die in the act, the death will be a glory"
    • Medea
      • Avenges her time, initially by her decision to kill Jason and later her decision to kill her children
        • Regains a personal time, but the audience do not perceive it as time rather as hubris
        • Time by any means possible!
          • The whole narrative focuses around this!
      • Her honour is tainted by Jason's decision to leave her for Glauce
      • She has no status!
        • She is a single mother
        • She is a barbarian in Corinth
        • She can't return to her oikos because of the mass murder of Pelias
        • She does not belong to anyone!
      • "Laughter from my enemies will not be endured"
    • Hippolytus
      • Phaedra's harmartia due to her fear it will resonate upon her oikos
        • Her honour lies in her chastity inside marriage both being loyal and not committing incest
        • "Never may I be found guilty of bringing disgrace upon my husband or the children I have borne"
      • Hippolytus' honour to Artemis to the extent of hubris
      • Theseus is aware of his familial honour
        • Sees the rape of Phaedra both violent and incestual

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