Health and social care A912 understanding personal relationships and developments

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  • Health and social care GCSE Understanding Personal Development and Relationships A912
    • Growth and Development
      • Definitions
        • Growth- An increase in physical size (by height and mass/weight)
        • Development- The gain and increase in complexity, of new skills, abilities, emotions and organs and like the brain.
      • Life stages
        • Adolescence 10-18
          • PIES
            • Physical
              • Puberty occurs along with growth spurts
            • Interlectual
              • considers politics and morality, starts to plan ahead.
            • Emotional
              • Mood swings, testing authority.
            • Social
              • Peers become significant.
        • Childhood 4-10
          • PIES
            • Physical
              • Can hop, skip, walk along a line.
            • Interlectual
              • May take responsibility at school, develops memory.
            • Emotional
              • Can express feelings and needs in words, understands good/bad right/wrong
            • Social
              • Goes to school, interacts with other children and communicates comprehensively.
        • Infancy 0-3
          • PIES
            • Physical
              • Walks confidently, transfers objects from hand to hand.
            • Interlectual
              • Basic understanding of numbers.
            • Emotional
              • Smiles at an adult, enjoys being cuddled.
            • Social
              • Wary of adults, parallel play.
        • Adulthood    19-65
          • PIES
            • Physical
              • Menopause,hair loss slight increase in height may still occur.
            • Interlectual
              • Holds political views and can form sophisticated opinions, can plan ahead, and make difficult decisions.
            • Emotional
              • Emotionally stable, can form strong emotional bonds with husband and children (if applicable).
            • Social
              • Marriage and children means social group may change.
        • Later adulthood 65+
          • PIES
            • Physical
              • Eyesight and hearing may deteriorate.
            • Interlectual
              • Decline in mental health.
            • Emotional
              • Memories may be lost and bonds with family may be lost from one side.
            • Social
              • Family may become more significant due to more time to see them, may become isolated or go into care.
        • Key points
          • Adolecence
            • -Ggrowth spurt(8-16cm/Yr) during puberty -For girls puberty useually occurs between 10 and 16 for boys it usually occurs between 12 and 18
          • Childhood
            • -Growth is constant and slower.              -Skull and brain are full size by age five, but jaw continues to develop to fit permanent teeth.
          • Adulthood
            • -No change in height               -Weight can increase if adjustments are not made for changes in lifestyle.
          • Infancy
            • -Rapid growth in the first two years.               -Weight triples in the first year.
          • Later adulthood
            • Height loss and deterioration in body and mind may occur.
      • Expected patterns in growth- When you grow according and comparing to the average person and the milestones
        • Milestones- what is considered normal development for the majority of the population (e.g. smiling, walking and talking at set ages).
      • Centile charts (also known as percentile charts)
        • Centile charts are used to compare a child's growth with the rest of the population.
          • They show the average and expected patterns of growth
            • E.G. On a weight chart the 50h centile(usually the solid lie down the centre) is the average, with 50% of children weighing more and 50% weight less.
    • Factors affecting growth and development

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