Glorious Revolution 1688-1701

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  • Glorious Revolution
    • 1688
      • 'Immortal Seven' invite William to invade
      • William lands at Torbay
      • James tries to fight but NOSEBLEEDS
      • James flees - brought back by fisherman
      • William allows James to 'escape' to France
    • 1689
      • William and Mary crowned joint monarchs
        • appease Tory belief in hereditary principle
        • Declaration of Rights read out
      • Toleration Act
        • Dissenters allowed freedom of worship
        • Had to swear oath to Anglican church for public jobs
      • Bill of Rights
        • No standing army
        • No royal veto without parliament consent
        • Frequent elections
        • Parliament called regularly
      • Mutiny Acts
        • Annual
    • 1690
      • Convention Parliament dissolved
        • 225 whigs, 206 Tories
      • Battle of the Boyne
        • 80,000 soldiers
          • 40,000 James Died
          • 8,000 William died
    • 1694
      • Triennial Act
        • Rage of Party
        • increased rivalry between Whigs and Tories
        • Refused by William twice before
      • Mary Died
      • Bank of England Founded
        • Tontine Loans
    • 1695
      • Licensing Act lapsed
        • Pamphlets for politics grew
    • 1696
      • plot to assasinate William from Stuart sympathisers eisconere
        • William more dependent on Whig Junto
      • 'Association' not signed by 89 Tories
      • Recoinage Act
    • 1698
      • Court and Country rivalry
        • Country secured army of 7000
    • 1699
      • Bill of Resumption
        • Privy council give back Irish land
    • 1691
      • Public Accounts Commission
        • Renewed until 1697
    • 1701
      • Act of Settlement
        • An Act for the Further Limitation of the Crown.
        • Monarchs had to be Church of England
        • Hanover dynasty after Anne
      • Tories gaining majority
  • Whig Junto becomes more significant
    • Supported Nine Years War
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