Gender differences in subject choice

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  • Created by: charl_w
  • Created on: 05-04-15 12:11
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  • Gender and subject choice
    • Early socialisation
      • Early socialisation shapes children's gender identities.
      • In the family- from an early age, boys & girls are dressed differently and given different toys.
        • Boys regarded as being active, girls as being passive (Fiona Norman 1988)
      • At school- Eileen Bryne (1979) found teachers encourages boys to be tough and show initiative, whereas they expected girls to ne quiet and helpful
      • Leisure reading & subject choice
        • Murphy and Elwood (1988) found boys read hobby books and information texts so prefer science.
        • Girls read stories about people and prefer people.
      • Gender domains- tasks seen as either male or female territory.
        • These views are shaped by children's early experiences and by expectations of adults.
    • Gendered subject images
      • Subjects have a 'gender image'- either seen as male or female. E.g. science mainly taught by men, textbooks use boys interests as examples. As a result, seen as a masculine subject so mainly taken by boys.
      • EXAMPLE-Science mainly taught by men, textbooks use boys interests as examples. As a result, seen as a masculine subject so mainly taken by boys.j
    • Peer Pressure
      • Subject choice is influenced by peer pressure.
      • Boys opt out of music or dance as it falls outside their gender domain. Likely to attract negative responses from peers.
      • Girls likely to opt out of sports. Seen as a 'butch' or a 'lesbian'
    • Gendered career opportunities.
      • Employment is highly gendered. Jobs tend to be 'sex typed' as mens or womens.
        • This sex typing affects boys and girls ideas about what jobs are acceptable for their sex.
      • Women's jobs involve a narrow range of occupations falling into 4 categories:
        • Clerical, secretarial, personal services or cleaning.

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