evaluating the social learning theory

  • Created by: imyimss
  • Created on: 01-10-18 20:25
View mindmap
  • rejects the notion that learning is purely the outcome of a stimulus-response loop
    • recognises importance of cognitive processing of informational stimuli (mediational processes)
  • ANDSAGER et al
    • MEDIA + HEALTH RELATED BEHAVIOURS
      • EVALUATING SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY
        • recognises importance of cognitive processing of informational stimuli (mediational processes)
        • ISSUES OF CAUSILITY
          • SIEGAL et al
            • young people who possess deviant attitudes / values would seek out peers with similar attitudes
          • difficult to distinguish behaviours that develop because of SLT
        • PERRY et al
          • sex role development depends in part on children's tendencies to imitate same-sex individuals more than opposite-sex models
          • results show same-sex imitation is a viable mechanism of sex role development
          • children learn which behaviours are appropriate to each sex by observing frequencies male + female models perform various responses
        • BANDURA
          • children who saw adults be rewarded for aggression showed higher levels of aggression in their play
          • by including cognitions, Bandura is moving SLT away from behaviourism and into a less scientific, more subjective territory
          • ethical issues with Bobo doll experiment
          • valid generalisation as test on humans
          • tested on children might not be applicable to adults
    • perceived similarity to a model in an anti-alcohol advertisement was positively related to the messages effectiveness
    • provide a positive impact on promotional health campaigns
    • indirectly help combat problem behaviours like alcoholism
    • application to the real world
  • Do people learn behaviour from models, or do they seek out models who exhibit behaviour or attitudes they already favour?
    • ISSUES OF CAUSILITY
      • SIEGAL et al
        • young people who possess deviant attitudes / values would seek out peers with similar attitudes
      • difficult to distinguish behaviours that develop because of SLT
  • Cook & Mineka had monkeys watch a video of another monkey reacting with fear to a snake.
    • EXAMPLES
      • Phillips (1986) found that daily homicide rates in the US almost always increased in the week following a major boxing match
    • When the observer-monkeys had a chance to get food, they would not if it involved approaching a snake or a snake-like object (toy snakes).
      • strictly scientific - increased validity
    • monkeys evolutionary similar to humans
      • strictly scientific - increased validity
  • explains things behaviourism can't
    • The theory does not tell us why a child would be motivated to perform the same behaviours in the absence of the model
    • problem generalising between animals/ children /adults
      • involves cognitions - less scientific
        • ignores nature side of nature/  nurture
          • lots of research to support - creditability
  • Akers - probability of someone engaging in criminal behaviour increases when exposed to model who engages in it

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Approaches resources »