Criminal Courts and Lay People

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  • Criminal Courts and Lay People
    • Crown Court
      • Indictable offences
      • Triable either way offences
      • Referrals for sentencing from Magistrates
      • Appeals from Magistrates
    • Role of a Jury
      • Decide on the guilt of a defendant
      • 12 jurors come to an unanimous decision
        • Sometimes 11:1 or 10:2
      • How to become a Juror
        • Randomly chosen from electoral register
        • 18-70 on day service begins
        • Lived in UK for at least 5 years after becoming 13
        • How to avoid being a juror
          • Disqualification - bail, criminal conviction, mental health
          • Deferral - complete service within 12 months, good excuse to defer e.g. exams
          • Excusal - juror in past 2 years, armed forces, MPs
          • Vetting of the jury
            • Examining juror to see if they're suitable e.g. CRB checks
            • Challenge for cause - individual members are challenged
              • Challenges to array - whole jury is questioned
        • Juror's role
          • Reach a verdict
          • Judge on facts and apply law from judge
          • 2 hours and 10 minutes minimum to debate
          • Advantages
            • Reduced state input - Devlin "the lamp that shows that freedom lives"
            • R V Ponting - jury ignored judge's advice
            • Perverse decisions - R V Kronlid - acquitted of £1 and 1/2 million
            • Public participation
            • Disadvantages
              • No reason for decision - R V Young (ouija board)
              • Not representative due to exclusions and vetting
              • Lack of understanding - don't have to sit in complex fraud trials
              • May have negative effects on jurors

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