AS English language theories

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  • AS English language theories
    • Giles : accommodation theory - proposes that we adjust our language in accordance with whom we are addressing
      • Links with convergence and divergence : convergence is moving towards another person's and divergence is where we move it away
      • Links with categorisation theory : we change the way we use language according to how  we categorise ourselves in each context
      • Links with Cheshire's Reading study: girls were more likely to adapt their language in a formal environment
    • Instrumental and influential power : instrumental power is given to authority and influential power iis given to memorable figures
      • Links with overt and cover prestige : overt prestige is given to high status features and covert prestige is given to low status features
      • Links with Bernstein's codes : people with instrumental power would typically use elaborated code
      • Link with social networks: people with instrumental power may have a multiplex network
    • Labov's New York department store study: investigated occurrence of postvocalic /r/. When researcher asked the assistants to repeat, the 'r' became more pronounced
      • Links with accommodation theory
      • Links with overt and covert prestige
      • Links with categorisation theory
    • Categorisation theory: we change our language according to how we categorise ourselves in each context
      • Links with  social networks : if our network is multiplex then we belong to a number of cultural groups
      • Link with Martha's Vineyard study: residents categorised themselves as tourists
      • Link with overt and covert prestige: features used in these cultural groups may have language prestige atatched
    • Face theory: positive face is the desire to be liked and negative face is the desire to be independent
      • Link with IRF discourse structure: in order to have positive face this structure must be met
      • Link with categorisation theory: our 'face' depends on how we categorise ourselves in each context
  • Labov's New York department store study: investigated occurrence of postvocalic /r/. When researcher asked the assistants to repeat, the 'r' became more pronounced
    • Links with accommodation theory
    • Links with overt and covert prestige
    • Links with categorisation theory

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