Additional Member System

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  • Additional Member System
    • AMS is a system which produces proportional representation.
      • In the 2015 Election it failed to do its job and produce a coalition (no party with a majority)
        • SNP had a majority with 56/59 available seats in Scotland.
          • In 2016, they were 3 short of a majority - AMS did its job in not producing a single winner (though SNP will govern as a minority government in Scottish Parliament.
    • Strengths
      • More proportional outcome
      • All votes count for at least regional or constituency votes.
      • Retains the single member constituencies - retains constituency-MP link like FPTP.
      • Argument that this system would increase political particapation as voters would think their vote counts more.
        • HOWEVER - a change of system does NOT guarantee increased turnout if there is widespread apathy.
          • In Welsh Assembly Elections 2011 - low turnout of 42%
            • 2011, the lowest constituency turnout was 31% in Swansea East
    • Weaknesses
      • Could create confusion over what people should do with their two votes.
        • However, has proved itself successful in elections in devolved assemblies.
      • As usually creates coalitions or minority governments - there is no clear winner and parties in coalitions are not accountable to a mandate.
      • Many MPs given seats due to the differential top up system are only accountable to their party - not any constituencies.
    • Hybrid System
      • Produces proportional representation
      • Produces a multi-party system giving a wider scope of parties chance for input.
        • Has increased popularity of nationalist parties (SNP, Plaid Cymru)
      • Produces coalition governmen usually (with the exception of SNP in 2015 GE
  • Workings
    • 1) Voters get 2 votes - one for a candidate and one for a party.
      • 2) Each constituency returns a single MP
        • 3) The votes for regional seats are gained using the Closed Party List system.
          • 4) Using the differential top up method, the results of the regional list part top up the seats of those who were disadvantaged in the FPTP part.
            • If a party does well in the constituency vote, they will do badly in the regional vote. The number of seats should proportionately mirror the closed party list results.
            • 2016 - The Conservatives who are usually unpopular in Scotland got 31 seats from a top up of 24 with 7 constituency seats won.
            • UKIP got 7 regional seats due to the differential top up method in Wales.
            • SNP missed out on getting a majority due to the fact the differential top up which only awarded them 4 more seats. They got 59 constituency seats. 
    • Additional Member System
      • AMS is a system which produces proportional representation.
        • In the 2015 Election it failed to do its job and produce a coalition (no party with a majority)
          • SNP had a majority with 56/59 available seats in Scotland.
            • In 2016, they were 3 short of a majority - AMS did its job in not producing a single winner (though SNP will govern as a minority government in Scottish Parliament.
      • Strengths
        • More proportional outcome
        • All votes count for at least regional or constituency votes.
        • Retains the single member constituencies - retains constituency-MP link like FPTP.
        • Argument that this system would increase political particapation as voters would think their vote counts more.
          • HOWEVER - a change of system does NOT guarantee increased turnout if there is widespread apathy.
            • In Welsh Assembly Elections 2011 - low turnout of 42%
              • 2011, the lowest constituency turnout was 31% in Swansea East
      • Weaknesses
        • Could create confusion over what people should do with their two votes.
          • However, has proved itself successful in elections in devolved assemblies.
        • As usually creates coalitions or minority governments - there is no clear winner and parties in coalitions are not accountable to a mandate.
        • Many MPs given seats due to the differential top up system are only accountable to their party - not any constituencies.
      • Hybrid System
        • Produces proportional representation
        • Produces a multi-party system giving a wider scope of parties chance for input.
          • Has increased popularity of nationalist parties (SNP, Plaid Cymru)
        • Produces coalition governmen usually (with the exception of SNP in 2015 GE

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