WJEC EDUQAS anthology

Content of Sonnet 43
The poet is describing her love for her future husband ,Robert Browning. She describes her intensity of her love , which is powerful and all-encompassing.
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Poet and Context of Sonnet 43
Elizabeth Barrett Browning, ran away to Italy with Robert Browning to escape her father's disapproval. She wrote this poem for her husband as a secret way to express her love. her husband published the poem as she had no intention of doing so.
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Structure of Sonnet 43
The poem is written in the form of a traditional Petrarchan sonnet. Lines 1-8 form the octave which sets out the theme of the poem. Lines 9-14 form the sestet.
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Quotes for Sonnet 43
'For the ends of Being and ideal Grace' 'How do i love thee?' 'I love thee to the depth and breadth and height' 'My soul can reach'
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Content of London
The author is walking through the streets of London writing about what he sees around him. The conditions he witnesses and the instances of human suffering.
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Poet and Context of London
William Blake was disillusioned with authority and industrialisation . He talks about how poor living conditions could spark a revolution in the streets of his own capital city.
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Structure of London
The rhyme scheme is ABAB to keep the same pessimistic tone. All stanzas four lines long to make its sound like a song because it was released in 'Songs of experience'. Simple structure cause it was for kids.
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Quotes for London
'I wander thro' each charter'd street' 'marks of weakness, marks of woe' 'the marriage hearse'
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Structure for The Soldier
The poem is wrote in the form of a sonnet, which is usually associated with love poems. Brooke has done this to show the love for his country. There is a volta (a shift in message) between the first and second stanza.
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Content of She Walks In Beauty
Byron describe the unusual beauty of a mourning woman who he saw at a ball.
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Poet and Context of She Walks In Beauty
Lord Byron was a leading poet of a group called the romantics. he was mystified by a woman's beauty/aura. He considered emotion stronger than logicand was known as 'mad, bad and dangerous to know'
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Structure of She Walks In Beauty
The poem is wrote in iambic tetrameter because it was published in 'Hebrew Melodies' . Each stanza has six lines and a steady rhyme scheme.
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Quotes for She Walks In Beauty
'So soft, so calm, yet eloquent' 'she walks in beauty, like the night' 'all that''s best of dark and bright'
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Content for As Imperceptibly As Grief
The poet is writing about her initial regret about the passing of time and the changing of the seasons.About the grief of losing someone.
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Poet and Context for As Imperceptibly As Grief
Emily Dickinson was a reclusive and she did not leave her house for thirty years. This means she enjoyed the company of others and didn't like when they had to leave.
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Structure for As Imperceptibly As Grief
There is no set rhyme scheme .
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Quotes for As Imperceptibly As Grief
'The morning foreign shone' 'our summer made her light escape' 'a courteous, yet harrowing grace'
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Content for Cozy Apologia
In this autobiographical poem , the poet expresses her love for her husband, Fred, whilst there is a storm approaching. The poet apologises for being so content with her husband over such a simple life
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Poet and Context for Cozy Apologia
Rita Dove refers to her struggle with society's opinion on who she should love. She also refers to Hurricane Floyd which causded $6 billion worth of damage
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Structure for Cozy Apologia
Each stanza focuses on a different aspect of their relationship.The enjambment between stanza two and three shows that the storm is breaking things up
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Quotes for Cozy Apologia
'Big Bad Floyd' Floyd's cussing up a storm' 'When has ordinary ever been news?' 'I fill this stolen time with you'
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Content for Valentine
The poet writes about giving an unusual valentines day gift-an onion.
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Poet and Context for Valentine
Carol Ann Duffy was asked by a radio producer to produce a unique poem for valentines day. She chooses to criticise the conventional and cliched symbols of romance and relationships.
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Structure for Valentine
Dramatic Monologue. Language is straight forward and simple like her message.
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Quotes for Valentine
'Not a red rose or a satin heart' 'I give you an onion' 'It's scent will cling to your fingers' 'It will blind you with tears like a lover'
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Structure for A Wife In London
The rhyme scheme is ABAB. There are two clear sections- the tragedy and the irony.
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Content for Hawk Roosting
The peom is literally about a hawk as he sits at the top of a wood. Metaphorically it's a warning about political leaders who have too much power
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Poet and Context for Hawk Roosting
Ted Hughes published Hawk Roosting in a collection of poems about nature and animals .When it was first published people thought it was about a dictator and the symbol for the Nazis was an Eagle on top of a wreath.
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Structure for Hawk Roosting
The poem progressively gets worse the further down you get. The stanzas are all of equal lines to give it a feel of a political speech. Every stanza starts with a declarative statement.
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Quotes for Hawk Roosting
'The allotment of death' 'Now i hold creation in my foot' 'i kill where i please because it is all mine' 'I am going to keep things like this'
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Content for Afternoons
The poet is writing about what he observes as he sees young mothers watching their children play on the swings.
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Poet and Context of Afternoons
Philip Larkin is known for writing rather negative poems. He never got married, never had children, never travelled abroad and worked worked as a librarian in Hull for thirty years.
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Structure for Afternoons
All the stanzas are the same length showing everything is the same like a routine and a change in time.
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Quotes for Afternoons
'So intent on finding more unripe acorns' 'Something is pushing them to the sides of their own lives' 'An estateful of washing' 'Young mothers assmeble'
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Content for Ozymandias
The poem describes the ruined statue, found in a desert, of a once great and powerful king, Ramesses the second. It shows that not just anyone can have power, but everyone can lose it.
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Poet and Context for Ozymandias
Percy Bysshe Shelley was part of the Romantic movement. Shelly's criticism of people who act as if they are invincible is inherent in the poem.
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Structure for Ozymandias
The poem is wrote as a 14 line sonnet although it does not contain the rhyme scheme and punctuation of most sonnets. The octave is a description about that statue and his personality. The sestet (bottom six lines) where we learn about the pedestal.
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Quotes for Ozymandias
'My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings' 'the hand that mocked them' 'the heart that fed' 'boundless and bare'
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Quotes for Death of a Naturalist
'warm thick slobber' 'poised like mud grenades' 'wait and watch' 'miss walls would tell us how the daddy frog' 'the air was thick with a bass chorus'
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Structure for Death of a Naturalist
two stanzas. volta. first about love for nature, fascinated by it. second the child now fears nature , lost love for it.
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Content for Death of a Naturalist
a child who is amazed by nature and frogs in the pond, but as he grows up he loses this sense of wonderment and now fears the frogs
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Poet and Context for Death of a Naturalist
Seamus Heaney is an Irish poet who grew up in the country side so was constantly surrounded by nature
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Quotes for To Autumn
'where are the songs of spring?' 'close bosom-friend of the maturing sun' 'thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind' 'with patient look' 'oozings hours by hours' '
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Structure for To Autumn
three stanzas each about different aspects of autumn. stanza one is about the intimacy autumn has with the sun two is about the personification of autumn as a goddess and three is about telling autumn not to worry about other seasons
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Content for To Autumn
its an ode to autumn describing its richness and wonders
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poet and context for to autumn
John keats was a romantic poet who wrote the poem after a walk on an autumn evening. the seasons were often depicted as women in European art(1819) . he was also dying
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quotes for the prelude
'through the darkness and the cold we flew' 'we hiss'd along the polish'd ice' 'like an untir'd horse ,that cares not for his home' 'the orange sky of evening died away'
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content for the prelude
it is an extract of a longer poem about a past childhood memory of skating on a frozen lake as it become night time
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structure for the prelude
one long stanza, narrative, about a personal experience with a passage of time of abut an hour
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poet and context for the prelude
William Wordsworth marked the moment of the romantic movement .
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Poet and Context of Sonnet 43

Back

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, ran away to Italy with Robert Browning to escape her father's disapproval. She wrote this poem for her husband as a secret way to express her love. her husband published the poem as she had no intention of doing so.

Card 3

Front

Structure of Sonnet 43

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Quotes for Sonnet 43

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Content of London

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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Comments

lucy.baxter

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ooooh i found your resource by accident ;)

Daddy_V

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THANK VERY MUCH

xXXTr1CkSh0TtEr420XXx

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GOOOOOOOOOOOOD

e.eoxox

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HEY BABE

Joshua Osullivan

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You are a living legend

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