Parliament Flashcards

The examples flashcards most likely will not match up with the examples that you've learned in lesson

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  • Created by: goliver3
  • Created on: 04-05-17 11:11
When was the Law Commission set up?
1965
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Who are the Law Commissions topics chosen by?
The Lord Chancellor, or itself
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What are the three influences the Law Commission has?
Repeal, Consolidate, and Codify
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What is an example of an act repealed by the Law Commission?
Law Reform (Year and a Day Rule) Act 1996, or the double jeopardy rule
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What is an example of an act consolidated by the Law Commission?
Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000
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What is an example of an act codified by the Law Commission?
Offences Against the Person Act 1861
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What is an example of law suggested and enacted by the Law Commission?
Land Registration Act 2002, Fraud Act 2006, or the Coroners and Justice Act 2009
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What is an insider pressure group?
A pressure group which has direct access to MPs
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What is an example of an insider pressure group?
The Chamber of British Industry
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What is an outsider pressure group?
A pressure group which has no access to MPs except for lobbying
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What is an example of an outsider pressure group?
Fathers 4 Justice
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What is a sectional pressure group?
A pressure group that represents a section of society - 'who'
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What is a cause pressure group?
A pressure group that represents a certain cause - 'what'
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What does sectional pressure groups influence rely on?
Government/electoral support
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What is an example of a sectional pressure group?
National Farmers Union, British Medical Association, or National Union of Teachers
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What does cause pressure groups influence rely on?
Media coverage and/or lobbying
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What is an example of a cause pressure group?
RSPCA, or Mary Whitehouse
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What is an example of legislation put in place due to cause pressure groups?
Animal Welfare Act 2006, or Protection of Children Act 1978
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What is lobbying?
When outsider pressure groups try to persuade MPs to support their cause
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Who defined parliamentary supremacy?
Dicey in the 19th century
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What are the two sections of parliamentary supremacy?
Legal supremacy and political supremacy
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What holds power over the London Parliament (legal supremacy)?
EU Parliament (European Communities Act 1971)
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What overrules the House of Lords (legal supremacy)?
The House of Commons (such as with the Hunting Act 2004)
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Which acts dictate the house supremacy (legal supremacy)?
The Parliament Acts of 1911 and 1949
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What are the three parts of political supremacy?
Can legislate on any subject matter (Parliament Acts of 1911 and 1949), cannot bind successors (however some acts would be difficult to abolish such as the Act of Settlement 1700), and cannot be overruled by others (as in BRB v Pickin (1974))
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What are the limitations on supremacy?
Member of the EU, effects of the Human Rights Act 1988, and devolution (Scotland/Wales Act 1998)
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What are green papers?
An initial consulation document issued by the government
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What is the purpose of green papers?
To gain views about legislation
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What are white papers?
A document which sets out the government's preferred approach to legislation, and allows final changes before Bill is presented to Parliament
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What are white papers not meant for?
Consultation
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What is the order of the formal legislative process?
First reading, second reading, committee stage, report stage, third reading, House of Lords, Royal Assent
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Who examine each clause of the Bill in the committee stage?
A Standing Committee made of 16-50 MPs
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After what point is the bill unlikely to fail?
The third reading
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Which stages aren't included in the House of Lords?
The report stage (parliamentary ping-pong) and the Royal Assent
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When was the last time a Bill was refused by a monarch?
The Scottish Militia Bill in 1707 by Queen Anne
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What are three advantages of the Law Commission?
Any three: areas of law are researched by legal experts, it consults before finishing proposals, whole areas of law can be considered, makes law easier to find and to understand
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What are three disadvantages of the Law Commission?
Any three: can only advise parliament, parliament takes a long time to discuss the preposed reforms, some reforms have still not been looked at, limited time is available for discussion, law reforms take years to be implemented
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Which reforms have still not been viewed by Parliament?
Offences Against the Person (Law Com No 218) and the Liability for Psychiatric Illness (Law Com 249)
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Which report took over 6 years to be implemented?
The Report on Conspiracy and Attempts (2009)
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What are three advantages of Pressure Groups?
Any three: huge membership, expertise, increase parliamentary awareness, raises public awareness (HEIR)
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What are three disadvantages of Pressure Groups?
Passionately held views, one-sided, opinions of the small section, little contact with parliament (POOL)
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What are five advantages of parliamentary law making?
Any five: democratic, general election means government will be voted out if public don't agree, Acts can reform whole areas, judges have little power, delegated legislation, thorough dicussion, cannot be challenged
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What are five disadvantages of parliamentary law making?
Any five: not enough time for reforms, lack of reform, rushed decisions, PM Bills voted out, long and complex acts, can become more complicated when amended, not many PM Bills become law
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Who are the Law Commissions topics chosen by?

Back

The Lord Chancellor, or itself

Card 3

Front

What are the three influences the Law Commission has?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is an example of an act repealed by the Law Commission?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is an example of an act consolidated by the Law Commission?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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