Relationships - Theories of romantic relationship

a theory of how relationships form and develop. it assumes that romantic partners act out of self-interest in exchanging rewards and costs.
social exchange theory
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this is the amount of reward that you believed you deserve to get.
comparison level
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this is whether we feel we could have a better reward if we were with someone else
comparison levels for alternatives
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the first stage of relationship development. this is when we explore the rewards and costs of social exchange by experimenting with them in our own relationships or by obsess ing others do so
sampling
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the second stage of relationship development. this marks the beginning of a relationship, when romantic partners start exchanging various rewards and costs , negotiating and identifying what is more profitable
bargaining
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the third stage of relationship development. as time goes on, the sources of costs and rewards become more predictable and the relationship becomes more stable as the rewards increase and the costs lessen
commitment
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the final stage of relationship development. the partners are now settled down because the norms of the relationship, in terms or costs and rewards are firmly established.
institutionalisation
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an economic theory of how relationships develop. it shows that the rewards and costs must be balanced for a relationship to develop
equity theory
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a romantic partner's intention or desire to continue a relationship, reflecting a belief that the relationship will last long term
commitment
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the extent to which romantic partners feel the rewards of the relationship exceed the costs
satisfaction
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a judgement that partners make considering whether a relationship with a different partner would bring more rewards and fewer costs
comparison with alternatives
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the resource associated with a romantic relationship which the partners would lose if the relationship were to end
investments
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any resources which we put directly into the relationship, e.g. money, time, energy
intrinsic investments
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any resources hat were not their prior to the relationship, e.g. a shared house, children, pets
extrinsic investment
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an explanation of the stages people go through when their relationship is not working
duck's phase model
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the year this model was produced
2007
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the first stage of the model. the partner dwells on the negatives of the relationship but may only share them with a trusted friend. "I can't stand this anymore"
intra-psychic phase
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the second stage of the model. the partners talk about their thoughts and feelings, this is where they will discover whether they want the relationship to continue or not. "I would be justified in withdrawing"
dyadic phase
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the third stage of the model. the partners now share the breakdown of their relationship with their friends and family, mutual friends will often have to pick a side to avoid arguments "I mean it"
social phase
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the final stage of the model. the partners both move on from the breakup and start to make new relationships. " its now inevitable"
grave-dressing phase
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

this is the amount of reward that you believed you deserve to get.

Back

comparison level

Card 3

Front

this is whether we feel we could have a better reward if we were with someone else

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

the first stage of relationship development. this is when we explore the rewards and costs of social exchange by experimenting with them in our own relationships or by obsess ing others do so

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

the second stage of relationship development. this marks the beginning of a relationship, when romantic partners start exchanging various rewards and costs , negotiating and identifying what is more profitable

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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