Region

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  • Created by: annie1405
  • Created on: 30-08-17 23:22
Accent
The way that people prounounce sounds due to where their from geographically or socially and can be seen as a badge of belonging
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Recieved Pronunciaton (RP) /Non regional
An accent influenced by social class rather then where you come from and is associated with the upper class such as the queen, the royal family and old BBC presenters
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Regional Accents
Influenced by where you come from and is associated with that area e.g. geordies from newcastle
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Descriptivist
The belief that correctness is dependant on context and should be defined by what is appropriate in any context.
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Prescriptivist
The belief that theres an absolue authority determining what is correct usage of language based on rules established in the past
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Rhotic
Accents where speakers produce the post vocalic /r/ such as in many rural accents in the south west region of the UK
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Covert Prestige
Status fained from peer group recogniting rather then public acknowledgement
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Estuary English 'modified regional speech'
A continuum between RP and cockney combining regional accents which is used in South East England. Seen as evidence of Dialect levelling. Estuary refers to the Thames Estuary Area.
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Multicultural London English (MLE)
A recent variety combining elements of the language of different ethnic groups, particularly afro caribbean English. The variety arose in london but has spread across the UK
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Overt Prestige
Status that is publicly acknowlegded
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Dialect Levelling
The way in which dialect terms have been dropping out of use refering to the reduction or elmination of market differences between dialects over a period of time
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Slang
Language used in an informal context and is widely recognised
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Mixed Guise Technique
An experimental technique where a single actor puts on a different accent for different audiences but keeps the context of the speech the same. Used by Giles
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Dialect
Refers to vocabulary and grammar but can also refer to accent sometimes
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Trudgill (RP) 1974
Estimated that in 1974 only 3% of speakers used RP
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Standard English
Commonly associated with written language (grammar and vocab) rather then an accent
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Glottal stops
A lack of sound which describes closing of the vocal chords to prevent sound coming out. This can be used to replace /t/ in some regional accents (butter)
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Features of Estuary English
Glottal stops before a constanant (before a vowel seen as more at the cockney end of spectrum), L-vocalisation ( /L/ is pronounced as a vowel or a w), Confrontational tag questions (I said I would, didn't I?)
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Areas of grammatical variation
Prepositions, Pronouns, The verb 'to be', Other verb forms, Relativizers, Determiners, Double negation
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

An accent influenced by social class rather then where you come from and is associated with the upper class such as the queen, the royal family and old BBC presenters

Back

Recieved Pronunciaton (RP) /Non regional

Card 3

Front

Influenced by where you come from and is associated with that area e.g. geordies from newcastle

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

The belief that correctness is dependant on context and should be defined by what is appropriate in any context.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

The belief that theres an absolue authority determining what is correct usage of language based on rules established in the past

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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