lung capacity and lung tissues

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  • Created by: EClou
  • Created on: 09-04-15 11:32
what is the role of the cartilage in the trachea and the bronchi? (5)
structural support - holds open, prevents collapse due to low pressure at inhalation, allows oesophagus to expand when swallows, allows flexibility, move neck without constricting airways.
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what is the role of the smooth muscle in the trachea and the bronchi?
involuntary contraction of the muscle causes constriction of airway and restriction of air flow - useful when there are harmful substances in the air.
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what is the role of the elastic fibres in the Trachea and the bronchi?
allows for dilation of lumen due to recoil during relaxation of smooth muscle - involuntary constriction of lumen due to smooth muscle contraction causes elastic fibres to deform
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what is the role of the goblet cells/glandular tissue in the Trachea and Bronchi?
secretes mucus behind the endothelium to trap harmful air particles.
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what is the role of the ciliated epithelium in the trachea and the the bronchi?
waft mucus in a synchronised pattern to the back of the throat to be swallowed so that any bacteria can be murdered by the stomach acid.
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what is the difference between the trachea and the bronchi?
the trachea is bigger and wider then the bronchi
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what are the five requirements of airways?
larger airways must be large enough to allow sufficient airflow without obstruction
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2
they must branch into smaller airways and deliver air to all the alveoli
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3
they must be strong enough not to collapse under low pressure during inhalation
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4
they must be able to stretch and recoil
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5
they must be flexible to allow movement
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what do bronchioles do?
airways in the lungs they lead from the bronchi to the alveoli,
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what do they contain?
they're smaller than the bronchi and their walls are made mostly of smooth muscle and elastic fibres, the larger ones may have some ciliated epithelium, cartilage or goblet cells
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whats the difference between breathing and respiration?
respiration occurs in cells and is the release of energy from glucose , whilst breathing refers to the movements of the ribcage and diaphragm causing ventilation.
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what is tidal volume?
volume of air moved in and out of lungs in a normal breath (approx 0.5dm3 providing body with enough O2 and removing enough CO2)
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what is the vital capacity?
largest volume of air that can be moved in and out in one breath, its increased with regular exercise.
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what is the residual volume?
volume of air that always remains in lungs even after largest possible exhalation.
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what is the dead space?
the air in the bronchioles, bronchi and trachea with which there is no gas exchange between it and blood
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what is the inspiratory reserve volume?
how much more air can be breathed in over you tidal volume to reach you vital capacity
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what is the expiratory reserve?
how much more air ca be breathe out over your tidal volume to reach your vital capacity.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

what is the role of the smooth muscle in the trachea and the bronchi?

Back

involuntary contraction of the muscle causes constriction of airway and restriction of air flow - useful when there are harmful substances in the air.

Card 3

Front

what is the role of the elastic fibres in the Trachea and the bronchi?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

what is the role of the goblet cells/glandular tissue in the Trachea and Bronchi?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

what is the role of the ciliated epithelium in the trachea and the the bronchi?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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