Haemoglobin

  • Created by: LucyLaa
  • Created on: 23-06-17 11:09
Where is haemoglobin found?
Red Blood Cells
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What is a quaternary structure?
More than one polypeptide chain
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What do oxygen and haemoglobin combine to form?
Oxyhaemoglobin
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What is the haem group?
An iron ion
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Define Oxygen Affinity:
Haemoglobin's tendency to combine with oxygen
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What is partial pressure of Oxygen? (pO2)
The concentration of oxygen present.
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Where is there a high pO2?
The alveoli in the lungs
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Where does haemoglobin have a lower oxygen affinity?
At respiring tissues (more CO2)
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What is the Bohr effect?
This is where higher PCO2 causes a lower oxgyen affinity, caused by respiring cells. This allows more oxygen to be released into the cells during activity.
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Does Foetal haemoglobin have a higher or lower O2 affinity than Maternal haemoglobin?
Higher - this is because the only way to absorb oxygen is through the mother, so it must be strong at absorbing
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Put the types of haemoglobin in order of affinity (lowest first):
Bohr -> Normal -> Foetal -> Myoglobin
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Where is Myglobin found?
In muscles
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True or false: Higher affinity animals have an oxygen dissociation graph that is shifted to the left
True
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What would the Oxygen-Dissociation curve of a mouse look like?
Shifted to the right, high metabolism, Bohr Effect
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is a quaternary structure?

Back

More than one polypeptide chain

Card 3

Front

What do oxygen and haemoglobin combine to form?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the haem group?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Define Oxygen Affinity:

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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