Extract from 'Out of the Blue'

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"You have picked me out."
The word 'You' is open to alternative interpretation - a) God b) Terroist c) People watching. There is straight away a personal relationship with the reader.
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The title itself: 'Out of the Blue'
When you think of the colour 'blue', you automatically think of connotations to do with sadness (Out of misery). It could also be seen that the colour blue could reflect the sky or maybe the everyday catchphrase - quick and random.
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"...a distant shot..."
This implies the reader is watching the TV coverage of the disaster.
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"...building burning..."
The alliteration here sounds vague and anonymous - plosive emphasises harsh sounds of the surroundings; maybe a gunshot.
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"...that a white cotton shirt is twirling, turning."
The 'white' shirt gives connotations of death and clouds. Perhaps it is a sign of surrendor and an attempt to get attention. The verbs here are also gentle and calm movements - they are misleading at first. They could forshadow his death.
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"...waving, waving...waving, waving."
The repetition emphasises the continuous movements and expresses his deperation. The verbs are also in pairs, which could reflect the twin towers.
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"Small in the clouds..."
The word 'small' is almost insignificant; as if one soul dying wouldn't matter. The 'clouds' could be referring God and Heaven or perhaps it is reflecting the smoke of the tragedy.
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"Does anyone see a soul worth saving?"
The word 'anyone' could be referring to the TV people watching or maybe he is speaking directly to God. The question could be asking 'Why pick me out of all the others?' It could suggest he feels as though people are able but unwilling to help.
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"So when will you come?"
He is still expecting someone to help, so the style is still conversational - he doesn't sound desperate yet.
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"...watching, watching..."
The repetition reminds readers that nobody is acting to save him - it creates a sense of pathos towards the potential jumper.
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"...shaking crumbs or ******* out washing?"
These are normal/ everyday activities - the trivial, ordinary actions contrast with the seriousness of the situation.
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"The heat behind me is bullying, driving..."
The energetic words here contrast with the gentle movement of him waving. The heat is now personified, as if it is an animal attacking.
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"...the white of surrender..."
This reminds the reader that he has been waving a shirt. It could be referring to death, the surrendor of the terrorists or maybe the shirt/ flag.
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"A bird goes by."
The short sentences reflect urgency and panic. This phrase would usually be a peaceful image but here it emphasises that he's very high up. The bird could either be interpretated to be a plane or maybe a person or just a bird.
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"The depth is appalling."
Using the word 'depth' instead of 'height' shows that he's looking down rather than up - it creates a sense of urgency and tension with the reader.
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"...wind-milling, wheeling, spiralling, falling."
There are strong images here of air, sky and out-of-control movements. The long list of verbs emphasises how far they are falling. There are also lots of commas - a) Breathing heavy, as scared b) Hesitation c) Suffication from the smoke.
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"...that others like me...believing..."
There should be commas after each of these words/ phrases. The reduction of commas reflect limited time.
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"...here in the gills..."
This suggests a fish gasping for air, and continuous the underwater imagery of 'depth' from line 18.
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"I am still breathing."
This is almost a miracle and gives a sense of relief.
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"But tiring, tiring."
This line juxtaposes with the phrase 'I am still breathing.' It creates mixed emotions within the readers - bathos.
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"...wailing..."
This is mournful onompatopoeia - creates a sense of mournful desperation.
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"Do you see me, my love."
This reminds the reader that he's a real person with people who care about him. He's getting more emotional as death approaches. He could be: a) Talking to people on the ground b) On the phone talking to his loved ones.
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"...flagging."
This could be a pun: a) tired b) piece of cloth c) Flag
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Semantic field
The semantic field is movement and flying. There are many words associated with birds and flying.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The title itself: 'Out of the Blue'

Back

When you think of the colour 'blue', you automatically think of connotations to do with sadness (Out of misery). It could also be seen that the colour blue could reflect the sky or maybe the everyday catchphrase - quick and random.

Card 3

Front

"...a distant shot..."

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

"...building burning..."

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

"...that a white cotton shirt is twirling, turning."

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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