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Lord Byron- When we two parted (CONTEXT)- Romantic love
- Narrator recalls the day he and his lover parted - She didnt feel any affection for him anymore -He believes the sadness that he felt then foreshadowed the sadness he feels in the present
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Lord Byron- When we two parted (FORM)
-Poem consists of 8 line stanzas and a strong ABAB rhyme scheme and regular rhythem- "cold" "kiss" emphasises narrators pain
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Lord Byron- When we two parted (STRUCTURE)
-The poem moves through time (shifts between past and present and future -Juxtaposition of the past and present emphasises that there is no change in his inital feelings
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Lord Byron- When we two parted "HALF BROKEN HEARTED"
-Weren't properly in love with eachother -Narrator was deeply affected by their parting so accusing his lover of only ever being half in love with him -Himself as half of the couple meaning he is broken but his lover is not
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Lord Byron- When we two parted "WHEN WE TWO PARTED"
-Addresses his lover directly= more personal -Contrast of "THEY" in stanza 3= bond between the narrator and his lover which makes them seperate from others
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Lord Byron- When we two parted "WHY WERT THOU SO DEAR?"
-RQ emphasises how deeply he felt for her -He dosen't like to hear that she likes other men
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Lord Byron- When we two parted "WITH SILENCE AND TEARS"
-Repetition from stanza 1 -Emphasises secrecy adn sorrow (unable to move on and is still hurting)
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Lord Byron- When we two parted "IN SILENCE AND TEARS"
-Nothing to say to eachother any more -Relationship was a secret and unheard of
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Lord Byron- When we two parted (COMPARSON)
-"Pale" "Cold"- makes her sound like a corpse -Death -Death of relationship= Metaphorically
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Percy Shelley- Loves philosophy (CONEXT)- Romantic love
-Trying to persuade his lover to be with him romantically -Nature is connected in an inimate and loving way -Gods law should be obeyed -Asks women why she is not obeying Gods law
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Percy Shelley- Loves philosophy (FORM)
-Short and unsimple - Narrator believes that what he's saying is a simple truth and nothing but the truth -Regular ABAB rhyme scheme but two lines in each stanza don't fully rhyme which reflects the way that all of nature is harmony
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Percy Shelley- Loves philosophy (STRUCTURE)
-Tightly structured to be persuasive -Builds up evidence throughout each of the stanzas to support his own feelings and thoughts to make them come together
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Percy Shelley- Loves philosophy "FOUNTAINS"
-Imagery of flowing water shows that everything is connected to everything else and is flowing metaphorically
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Percy Shelley- Loves philosophy "WHAT IS ALL THIS SWEET WORK WORTH"
-Narrator questions the point of the world if his lover dosen't love him suggests love guves life meaning -Question can be a hyperbole might be over the top to persuade her
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Percy Shelley- Loves philosophy "IF THOU KISS ME NOT?"
-Monosyllabic and only has five syllables increases the impact of the quesitons and makes them stand out -Seperated from the rest of the poem just as the narrator is seperated from his lover
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Percy Shelley- Loves philosophy "FOUNTAINS MINGLE"
-Narrator uses personification to draw parallels between what happens in nature and his own desire to be with his lover
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Percy Shelley- Loves philosophy "MOUNTAINS KISS"
-Physical language hints at his frustration that he can't "kiss" and "clasp" his lover
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Percy Shelley- Loves philosophy (COMPARSON)
-Narrator uses natural imagery to argue his feelings -He and his lover should follow nature's example -Personifies nature, "mountains kiss" emphasises his argument that humans are part of the natural world and should behave in the same way
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Elizabeth Browning- Sonnet 29 (FORM)
-Loosely written in the petrarchan form -Octave stanzas presents a problem and the sestet provides a solution the solution comes earlier in the poem shows how the narrator was impatient
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Elizabeth Browning- Sonnet 29 (STRUCTURE)
-Transition from the problem to the solution reflects the difference between the narrator thinking about her lover and being with him this is emphasised by the reversal of the last lines
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Elizabeth Browning- Sonnet 29 "TWINE AND BUD"
-Natural imagery shows how her thoughts focus on him like a vine wraps around a tree -Her thoughts for him are always growing rapidly with the help of sunlight in the relationship, just like plants cannot grow and survive without sunlight- resource
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Elizabeth Browning- Sonnet 29 "I DO NOT THINK OF THEE"
-Reversal of the first line highlights the difference between thinking about him and being with him
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Elizabeth Browning- Sonnet 29 "I AM TOO NEAR"
-She dosen't have to think of him when she is with him (he's better than anything she's capable of imagining)
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Elizabeth Browning- Sonnet 29 "RENEW..RUSTLE"
-Imperatives and alliteration emphasise how much she wants him to act -Renew and make up
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Elizabeth Browning- Sonnet 29 "STRAGGLING GREEN"
-Vines are inferior to the tree her thoughts about her lover are inferior to the man himself
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Elizabeth Browning- Sonnet 29 (COMPARISON)
-In the 19th century a women was expectd to be reserved about her feelings and to submit to her husbends will, however the narrator expresses her desire and commands him to "renew" his presence in her life
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Thomas Hardy- Neutral tones (FORM)
-Written from the point of view of a man addressing a past lover -The first and last lines of each stanza rhyme which reflects how the memory of a past experience returns to affect the narrator in the present
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Thomas Hardy- Neutral tones (STRUCTURE)
-First three stanzas centre around a specific memory, then there is a time jump to the final stanza where the narrator reflects on love in general -Poem ends where it began with the image of a pond, this is a cyclical structure (repeatedly hurt)
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Thomas Hardy- Neutral tones "ROVE...OVER"
-Enjambment mimics how her eyes move over his face -"rove" and "over" look and sound similar which reflects the boredom he feels in the relationship
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Thomas Hardy- Neutral tones "THAT WINTER DAY"
-Pathetic fallacy reflects the feelings and how they both are emotionally cold towards eachother
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Thomas Hardy- Neutral tones "STARVING SOD;"
-Alliteration and personification emphasises the impression of suffering and how the lifeless ground reflects their dying relationship
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Thomas Hardy- Neutral tones "GREYISH LEAVES"
-Leaves are grey because they're rotting, and this reflects how their love has metaphorically decayed also -Repetition of this colour from the first stanza emphasises the decay
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Thomas Hardy- Neutral tones "PLAYED... LOST"
-Game imagery shows how love should be fun and playful but then the tears became "tedious" and they "lost"
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Thomas Hardy- Neutral tones (COMPARISON)
-The lanscape is drained of colour, the leaves are "grey" and the sun is "white". The lifeless landscape mirrors the death of the relationship and the narrator's sense of loss
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C.Day Lewis- Walking away (FORM)
-First person narrartor, this emphasises that it's talking about personal experiences -The use of emjambent and casesura contributes to the rhythm of the poem, which sounds like natural speech
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C.Day Lewis- Walking away (STRUCTURE)
-In the first two stanzas the narrator talks about the memory -In th final two stanzas he reflects on how the memory still pains him
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C.Day Lewis- Walking away "AWAY...BEHIND"
-Enjambment highlights the way the boy turns away from his father to follow the other boys
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C.Day Lewis- Walking away "LIKE A SATELLITE"
-Negative simile, a satellite isn't supposed to fall out of orbit and to drift away makes the son sound helpless and in danger -The simile also emphasises how the father has stopped being at the centre of his sons life
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C.Day Lewis- Walking away "EDDYING AWAY"
-Natural image that compares the son to something moving in a current of air or water, this reflects the uncertainty and lack of control
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C.Day Lewis- Walking away "GOD ALONE COULD PERFECTLY SHOW"
-Religous imagery, in the Bible God let go of Jesus, his only so, when Jesus came to Earth and was crucified. He did this to show humans that he loved them -That God alone could do it shows how difficult it is
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C.Day Lewis- Walking away "GNAWS"
-Animalistic and vicious choice of language, shows how the father is still affected by seeing his son go through the tough process of growing up
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C.Day Lewis- Walking away (COMPARISON)
-The memory continues to hurt him in the present day, it "GWANS" at his mind
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Maura Dooley- Letters from yorkshire (FORM)
-Written in free verse, which makes the poem flow like natural speech or a letter -Three line stanzas instead of an even number of lines makes the poem look disjointed, this reflects how the narrator feels disconnected from the man
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Maura Dooley- Letters from yorkshire (STRUCTURE)
-First three stanzas, the narrator shows how she and the man live different lives, despite this, it becomes clear in the final two stanzas that they have a deep connection
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Maura Dooley- Letters from yorkshire "FEEDING WORDS"
-Figurative language creates a contrast between her feeding words and him feeding people with his potatoes -Her actions seem artifical compared to his experiences of nature
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Maura Dooley- Letters from yorkshire "HIS KNUCKLES SINGING"
-Caesura shirfts the focus from his ordinary actions to personification, the personification shows the delight he feels
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Maura Dooley- Letters from yorkshire "WORD...WORLD"
-Alliteration and assonance make these words seem similar but they are also different, this reflects how his words make the speaker feel close to his world, but also remind her that she's distant from it
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Maura Dooley- Letters from yorkshire "BREAKING ICE...CLEARING A PATH"
-Description of mundane, physical tasks shows how he sees his life as ordinary, but also reiterates his connection with nature
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Maura Dooley- Letters from yorkshire "POURING AIR AND LIGHT"
-More natural than the words she writes. he writes to her about his day to day life and she romanticises it by describing it in terms of "air and light", an alomost magical description
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Maura Dooley- Letters from yorkshire (COMPARISON)
-Narrator compares her life to the letter writer's life, asking whether his is "more real", she seems to envy the simplicity of his life and his connection with nature
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Card 2

Front

Lord Byron- When we two parted (FORM)

Back

-Poem consists of 8 line stanzas and a strong ABAB rhyme scheme and regular rhythem- "cold" "kiss" emphasises narrators pain

Card 3

Front

Lord Byron- When we two parted (STRUCTURE)

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Lord Byron- When we two parted "HALF BROKEN HEARTED"

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Lord Byron- When we two parted "WHEN WE TWO PARTED"

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Preview of the front of card 5
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