Durkheim - Suicide

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  • Created by: Megan
  • Created on: 15-09-14 10:04
What are the two social facts that Durkheim suggested influence whether someone will commit suicide?
1) Social intergration 2) Moral regulation
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What does social intergration mean?
Refers to the extent to which individuals experience a sense of belonging to a group. In highly intergrated societies individuals feel a strong bond with and duty towards others.
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What does Moral Regulation mean?
The extent to which an individuals actions actions and desires are kept in check by norms & values.
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What are the 4 types of Suicide?
1)Egoistic 2)Altruistic 3)Anomic 4)Fatalistic
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What is EGOISITIC suicide?
Caused by too little social intergration. It is common in modern society. Caused by a lack of social ties and obligations.
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Give an example of EGOISTIC suicide?
There is a lower suicide rate in catholics than protestants because protestants have more invididual freedom in what to believe and how to express their faith. Wheras catholics are tightly intergrated by shared beliefs. Decreases in war time.
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What is ALTRUISTIC suicide?
Caused by too much social intergration. Altruism is the opposite of selfishness or egoism. It occurs when the individual has little value & where the groups interests override the individual. Suicide here is obligatory self sacrifce for the group.
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Give an example of ALTRUISTIC suicide?
In WW2 Japanese Kamikaze piolots were expected to crash their planes into American Warships.
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What is ANOMIC suicide?
Caused by too little moral regulation. Anomie means 'normlessness' & anomic suicide occurs when societys norms become unclear or are made obsolete by rapid social change, creating uncertaincy for individuals about what socitety expects from them.
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Give and example of ANOMIC suicide
Sudden economic slumps -Wall St. Crash 1929 lead to the depression of the 1930's, produced an increase in anomic suicides. So do economic booms. Durkheim says this is because it leads to expectations rising more quickly than they can be fulfilled
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What is FATALISTIC suicide?
Opposite of anomic suicide & is caused by too much moral regualtion. Fatalism is the belief that nothing can be done to affect their situation. This occurs when society regulates & controls individuals completely.
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Give an example of FATALISTIC suicide
Slaves and prisoners are the most commonly cited examples of groups likely to commit fatalistic suicides.
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How does Modern industrial society affect EGOISTIC suicide rates?
Lower levels of intigration. Individuals rights and freedoms become more important that obligations to the group, which weakens social bonds & gives rise to egoistic suicides.
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How does Modern industrial society affect ANOMIC suicide rates?
They are less effective in regulating individuals because they undergo rapid social change, which undermines norms and produces anomic suicides
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How does Traditional pre-industrial society affect ALTRUISTIC suicide rates?
Have higher levels of intergration. The group is more important than the individual and this gives rise to ALTRUISTIC suicides.
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How does Traditional pre-industrial society affect FATALISTIC suicide rates?
Societies that strictly regulate their members lives and impose rigidly ascribed status' that limit individuals oppertunities & this produces FATALISTIC suicides.
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Card 2

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What does social intergration mean?

Back

Refers to the extent to which individuals experience a sense of belonging to a group. In highly intergrated societies individuals feel a strong bond with and duty towards others.

Card 3

Front

What does Moral Regulation mean?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the 4 types of Suicide?

Back

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Card 5

Front

What is EGOISITIC suicide?

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