Development of Personality

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Define Personality
The thoughts, feelings and behaviours that make an individual unique
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Define Temperament
The genetic component of personality
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What is the aim of the study of temperament by Thomas, Chess and Birch
To discover whether ways of responding to the environment remain stable throughout life.
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What is the aim of the study of temperament by Buss and Plomin
To test the idea that temperament is innate
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What is the aim of the study of temperament by Kagan and Snidman
To investigate whether temperament is due to biological differences.
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Define Extraversion
A personality type that describes people who look to the outside world for entertainment
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Define Introversion
A personality type that describes people who are content with their own company
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Define Neuroticism
A personality type that describes people who are highly emotional and show a quick intense reaction to fear.
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Define the Personality Scale
Ways of measuring personality using yes/no questions. EPI, EPQ
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Characteristics of Antisocial Personality Disorder (APD)
- Not following the norms and laws of society - Being deceitful by lying, conning others and using other aliases - Being impulsive and not planning ahead - Being irritable and aggressive, often involved in physical fights or assaults
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Biological causes of APD
The amygdala and the prefrontal cortex are the two areas of the brain associated with APD
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Situational causes of APD
Socioeconomic factors including low family income and poor housing - Quality of life at home including poor parenting - Educational factors including low school achievement and leaving school at an early age.
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What is the results of Raines study on Biological causes of APD
The APD group had 11 per cent reduction in prefrontal grey matter compared with the control group.
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What is the result of Farrington's study on Situational causes of APD
Forty-One per cent of the males were convicted of at least one offence between the ages of 10 and 50. the most important risk factors for offending were criminal behaviour in the family, low school achievement, poverty and poor parenting
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What is the conclusion of Elanders study on Situational causes of APD
Disruptive behaviour in childhood can be used to predict APD in adulthood
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Implications of research into APD
- As researchers cannot decide on the cause of APD, It is difficult to know how to prevent and treat it. - If APD has a biological causer then it cannot be prevented
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Card 2

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Define Temperament

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The genetic component of personality

Card 3

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What is the aim of the study of temperament by Thomas, Chess and Birch

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Card 4

Front

What is the aim of the study of temperament by Buss and Plomin

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Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

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What is the aim of the study of temperament by Kagan and Snidman

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