Crime & Punishment - Methods of Law Enforcement

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Praetorian Guard - BC500-AD400
The Emperor's household guards. They were only used in emergencies to protect the Emperor from riots.
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Urban Cohorts BC500-AD400
3000 men. Their main duty was to keep order by stopping riots. They did not patrol the streets.
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Vigiles BC500-AD400
7000 men. Their main duty was preventing and putting out fires. On patrol at night, they tried to stop crimes or chased runaway slaves.
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Legionaries - BC500-AD400
There were about 30 legions in the Roman army. Each legion had between 4,000 and 6,000 soldiers, called legionaries. They were in charge of dealing with riots and disorder.
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Saxon: Blood Fueds
When murder was avenged by a relavive who killed someone in the killer's family. This death would then also be avenged.
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Saxon: Wergeld
A payment made to the family of the murdered person. The system reduced violence and improved community relations.
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Saxon & Norman: Tithings
A collection of 10 free men. If one was accused of a crime, the others made sure he went to court or they had to pay a fine for him.
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Saxon & Norman: Hue and Cry
Citizens had to turn out to search for and try to catch a criminal.
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Norman: Trial by Combat
Cases between two nobles could be settled by trial by combat (fight/duel). People in the Middle Ages thought that God would show who was right by helping the innocent man defeat his guilty opponent in a duel.
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Early Modern Britain: Parish Constables
Unpaid local people who kept the peace by arresting beggars and petty criminals. They also led the 'Hue & Cry'.
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Early Modern Britain: Thief Takers
Paid by the victim of crime to catch the criminal and bring them to justice.
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Early Modern Britain: Watchmen
Paid to patrol the streets of London.
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Early Modern Britain: Justices of the Peace
Their main role was to act as a Magistrate and administer justice. Tere were about 20 JPs per county. Each held the unpaid post for one year.
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Thames River Police
Started in 1798. Paid officers opperated from rowing boats, armed with cutlasses for self defence, and patrolled the river.
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The Bow Street Runners
Set up in 1749. Men paid by the magistrates to catch criminals.
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The Bow Street Horse Patrols
Set up in 1754, to patrol the streets. This was less successful as crime was dramatically increasing in London and they didn't have enough patrols.
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The Metropolitan Police Force
Set up in London in 1829. Recruits were well-paid and focused on preventing crime.
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Neighbourhood Watch Groups
Set up in 1982 to help people prevent and detect crime in a neighbourhood.
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Police Community Support Officers
Introduced in 2002 to aid the police, and patrol the streets.
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Sheriffs - 1100-1500
Theeir job was to track down and imprison criminals.If villagers did not catch a criminal in the 'Hue and Cry', it was the Sheriff and his Posse's job to do so.
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Card 2

Front

3000 men. Their main duty was to keep order by stopping riots. They did not patrol the streets.

Back

Urban Cohorts BC500-AD400

Card 3

Front

7000 men. Their main duty was preventing and putting out fires. On patrol at night, they tried to stop crimes or chased runaway slaves.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

There were about 30 legions in the Roman army. Each legion had between 4,000 and 6,000 soldiers, called legionaries. They were in charge of dealing with riots and disorder.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

When murder was avenged by a relavive who killed someone in the killer's family. This death would then also be avenged.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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