Biology HL Ch.7: Structures of proteins

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Define the primary structure of a protein
The sequence and number of amino acids in the polypeptide
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Define the secondary structure of a protein
The formation of alpha helices and beta pleated sheets stabilized by hydrogen bonding
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Why do secondary structures form?
Due to the polar covalent bonds of the a.a., usually folding so there are hydrogen bonds between C=O, and N-H
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What do the alpha helices and beta pleated sheets look like?
Alpha helixes look like spiral staircases. Beta pleated sheets look like corrugated roofing.
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Define the tertiary structure of a protein
The further folding of the polypeptide stabilized by interactions between R groups
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What are the interactions that form the tertiary structure of proteins?
1. Positively charged, and negatively charged R-groups. 2. Hydrophobic, and hydrophilic R-groups orientation to water. 3. Bonds between polar R-groups. 4. R-group of cysteine can form a covalent bond with another cysteine forming a disulphide bridge
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Define the quartenary structure of a protein
This exists in proteins with more than one polypeptide chain, or with prosthetic groups
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In what proteins are tertiary structures common?
"Globular" proteins, enzymes
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Define prosthetic groups
Non poly-peptide components
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Card 2

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Define the secondary structure of a protein

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The formation of alpha helices and beta pleated sheets stabilized by hydrogen bonding

Card 3

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Why do secondary structures form?

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Card 4

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What do the alpha helices and beta pleated sheets look like?

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Card 5

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Define the tertiary structure of a protein

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