What was the impact of the Crimean War on the Russian Autocracy?

  • Created by: petraral
  • Created on: 20-02-18 19:53

Defeat during the Crimean War (1853-56) led to Russia being seen as the 'sick man of Europe.' 

The West (Britain and France) were successful for numerous reasons:

  • Their soldiers were properly trained, unlike Russia's largely serf-based army
  • Modern warfare, with its use of advanced weaponry and transport (long-range rifles and steam ships) needed modern soldiers to match, not illiterate serfs.
  • The new energy of the Western campaign, encompassed by their newspapers, civilian populations, cables, modern ships, and communications, were all at great contrast to Russia's fumbling and limited campaign.
  • More significantly, industrial growth was at the root of their success; it had led to improved technology, communications and general modernity in the West.

What were Russia's failures? And what did these failures reflect about society as a whole?

  • The Russian soldier, although patriotic, was ill-equipped for modern warfare, lacking both basic supplies and modern weaponry.
  • The Russian serf-based army was only effective in full-frontal attacks, not in smaller units. 
  • Russian casualties were extremely high

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What was the impact of the Crimean War on the Russian Autocracy?

  • Created by: petraral
  • Created on: 20-02-18 19:53

Defeat during the Crimean War (1853-56) led to Russia being seen as the 'sick man of Europe.' 

The West (Britain and France) were successful for numerous reasons:

  • Their soldiers were properly trained, unlike Russia's largely serf-based army
  • Modern warfare, with its use of advanced weaponry and transport (long-range rifles and steam ships) needed modern soldiers to match, not illiterate serfs.
  • The new energy of the Western campaign, encompassed by their newspapers, civilian populations, cables, modern ships, and communications, were all at great contrast to Russia's fumbling and limited campaign.
  • More significantly, industrial growth was at the root of their success; it had led to improved technology, communications and general modernity in the West.

What were Russia's failures? And what did these failures reflect about society as a whole?

  • The Russian soldier, although patriotic, was ill-equipped for modern warfare, lacking both basic supplies and modern weaponry.
  • The Russian serf-based army was only effective in full-frontal attacks, not in smaller units. 
  • Russian casualties were extremely high

Comments

No comments have yet been made