English - Animal Farm

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Metaphor/ Symbolic Analysis -

Beasts of England: The Beasts of England Song 

Soon and late the day is coming,
Tyrant Man shall be o'erthrown,
And the fruitful fields of England
Shall be trod by beasts alone.

 Rings shall vanish from our noses,
And the harness from our back,
Bit and spur shall rust forever,
Cruel whips no more shall crack.

 Riches more than mind can picture,
Wheat and barley, oats and hay,
Clover, beans, and mangel-wurzels
Shall be ours upon that day.

 Bright will shine the fields of England,
Purer shall its waters be,
Sweeter yet shall blow its breezes
On the day that sets us free.

 For that day we all must labour,
Though we die before it break;
Cows and horses, geese and turkeys,
All must toil for freedom's sake.

Beasts of England, beasts of Ireland,
Beasts of every land and clime,
Hearken well and spread my tidings
Of the golden future time.

Comrade Napoleon: Comrade Napoleon

 Friend of fatherless!
Fountain of happiness!
Lord of the swill-bucket! Oh, how my soul is on
Fire when I gaze at thy
Calm and commanding eye,
Like the sun in the sky,
Comrade Napoleon!

7 Rules: The 7 Rules of the Farm

1.  Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.
2.  Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend.
3.  No animal shall wear clothes.
4.  No animal shall sleep in a bed with sheets.
5.  No animal shall drink alcohol in excess. 
6.  No animal shall kill any other animal without cause.
7.  All animals are equal.

Farmhouse: The Jones' farmhouse represents in many ways the very place where greed and lust dominate.  Unlike the barn, which is the fortress of the common man, the genuine concept of socialism, the farmhouse, where Napoleon and the pigs take over, symbolizes the Kremlin.  Even today the Kremlin is an important place to Russian leaders, who, instead of embracing Marxism, have created their own distorted view of communism and have shoved it down their peoples' (animals') throats. 

Animalism: The vague yet often referred to concept of animalism is used by Orwell to signify the generic view of socialism.  This view was first expounded by Karl Marx (old Major), who, in Orwell's opinion was naive in thinking that his philosophy would actually work.  Orwell, although agreeing with the overall concept of equality though socialism, was critical of Marx because he didn't take into account the greed and jealousy which would eventually undermine the entire cause.  This idea was shown through Napoleon and the other pigs, who, through persuasion and force became the dominant authority on the farm.

Gun/Flag: Probably the most profound metaphor in Orwell's Animal Farm is the idea of the gun and flag.   The nationalism the animals' feel is demonstrated through their daily processions and rituals where they practically worship the flag (their institution of the state and obviously not God).   These processions and parades grow more dramatic with the fall of socialism and


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