Electronic Structure

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Orbitals:

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  • All orbitals have space for 2 electrons
  • There is one s orbital on every shell (holding 2 electrons in the s subshell)
  • There are 3 p orbitals in every shell from the 2nd shell upward (holding 6 electrons in the p ubshell)
  • There are 5 d orbitals on every shell from the 3rd shell upward (holding 10 electrons in the d subshell)

Electrons do not like to be paired in an orbital and will go into a free one if available

If forced to pair, the electrons spin in opposite directin (up, down)

Sub shell notation is done like this:

1) The shell number (e.g 1)

2) The sub shell (e.g s)

3) The number of electrons in that subshell (e.g

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