'The Wife of Bath' and 'The Rivals' revision

Splitting Chaucer's 'The Wife of Bath's tale and prologue' and Sheridan's 'The Rivals' into their key themes with quotes

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  • Created by: Alice
  • Created on: 04-06-13 13:10

Money in Marriage (Context)

Context (Chaucer): 

  • Women were unable to get jobs unless their husbands were in the same profession
  • Women were unable to inherit money
  • Everytime a woman married her husband took ownership of all her possesions

Context (Sheridan):

  • Women were able to inherit money
  • Therefore women tended to be richer than they were in Chaucer's day
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Money (Quotes from texts)

Chaucer:

  • 'It is my good as wel as thyn, pardee!'
  • Thou shalt nat bothe ... be maister of my body and of my good'
  • 'Some seyde wommen loven best richesse'
  • 'Taak al my good, and lat my body go'
  • 'genterye is nat annexed to possessioun' 

The Rivals:

  • 'How charming poverty will be with him!'
  • 'My paltry wealth - that burden on the wings of love'
  • 'Why, is it not provoking ... to find myself made a mere Smithfield bargain of at last'
  • 'I should not be paid so well, if my hero knew that Delia was near fifty, and her own mistress'
  • Lydia 'likes [Absolute] better as a half-pay Ensign than if she knew he was the son and hier to Sir Anthony Abolute'
  • 'the fortune is saddled with a wife'
  • 'women are not used to weigh, and separate the motives of their affections' 
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Power in Marriage (Quotes)

Chaucer:

  • Her husband 'shal be both my dettour and my thral'
  • 'I shal have the power duringe al my lyf upon his propre body'
  • 'by verray force he rafte hir maydenhed'
  • 'Taak al my good, and lat my body go!'
  • 'And she obeyed hym in every thyng that myghte doon hym plesance or likyng'
  • 'What sholde I taken keep hem for to plese, But it were for my profit and myn ese?'
  • 'Oon of us two must bowen'
  • 'Wommen desiren to have sovereynetee, As wel over hir housbond as hir love'

The Rivals:

  • 'I'd as soon have them taght the black art as their alphabet!'
  • 'If I loved you less, I should never give you an uneasy moment'
  • 'any choice you have made would be my aversion'
  • 'I have set my sum of happiness on this cast, and not to suceed, were to be stripped of all'

The one who is least in love has the most power

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Deception

Chaucer

  • 'in the floor I lay as I were deed'
  • 'half as boldely kan ther no man swere and leyen, as a womman kan.'

The Rivals:

  • 'I wrote a letter to myself' - Lydia deliberately starts an arguement with 'Beverly'
  • 'I should not be paid so well, if my hero knew that Delia was near fifty, and her own mistress!'
  • 'the delights [Faulkland's deception] has deprived you of'
  • Absolutes deception is 'a mean, unmanly disposition'
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Role of Women

.Chaucer:

  • Women 'wayte what thyng we may nat lightly have'
  • 'It is an impossible that any clerk speke wel of wyves, but if it be of holy seintes lyves'
  • 'We love no man that taketh kepe or charge'
  • 'For half so boldely can ther no man / Swere and lyen as a womman can'

The Rivals

  • 'Why, is it not provoking ... to find myself made a mere Smithfield bargain of at last'
  • 'The fortune is saddled with a wife'
  • 'Women are not used to weigh, and separate the motives of their affections'
  • 'I'd as soon have them taught the black art as their alphabet!'
  • 'Thought does not become a young woman'
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Honour

Chaucer:

  • 'Genterye is nat annexed to possessioun'
  • 'Gentillesse cometh fro God allone'
  • 'And he ne wol doon hem but dishonour'

The Rivals:

  • 'This honour seems to me a marvellous false friend'
  • 'Your son ... insulted me in a manner which my honour could not brook.'
  • 'What the devil signifies right when your honour is concerned?'
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Romance

Chaucer:

  • 'His herte bathed in a bath of blisse'
  • 'and she obeyed hym in every thyng'
  • Woman want 'wayte thing we may nat lightly have'

The Rivals:

  • 'My paltry wealth ... that burden on the wings of love!'
  • Lydia likes Absolute 'better as a half-pay Ensign than if she knew he was the son and heir to Sir Anthony Absolute'
  • 'Women are not used to weigh, and separate the motives of their affections'
  • 'I have set my happiness on this cast, and not to suceed, were to be stripped of all'
  • 'If I loved you less, I should never give you an uneasy moment'
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Comments

Oriana Dempsey

Useful for what is there but brief!

Tasnima

thanks, would be much better if we knew the page reference and content behind it 

Nicole

Thanks this is a great resource but would be more useful if quotes had page references on them and told us who said it as it is hard to write about otherwise.

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