The Hierarchy Of Courts

Criminal Courts:

  • Supreme Court
  • Court Of Appeal (Criminal Division)
  • High Court Administrative Court
  • Crown Court
  • Magistrates' Court

Civil Court:

  • Supreme Court
  • Court Of Appeal (Criminal Division)
  • High Court (Chancery Division, Queen's Bench Division, Family Division)
  • County Court
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Criminal Courts - Magistrates' and Crown Court

Criminal defendants will be tried in either Magistrates' Court or Crown Court.

If the decision in the original trial is not believed to be correct, defendants are allowed to appeal. This means that their case will be reviewed in a different court, and the verdict could possibly change.

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Criminal Courts - Appeals Courts

The route an appeal takes depends on:

  • Whether the case was tried in Magistrates' Court or Crown Court
  • The reason for appeal

This is the way it works:

  • Crown Court - for most appeales from Magistrates' Court
  • High Court Administrive Court - for appeales from the Magistrates' Court on points of law
  • Court Of Appeal (Criminal Division) - for appeals from Crown Court
  • Supreme Court - for further appeal from the Court Of Appeal
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Civil Court - High Court and County Court

Civil Cases are tried in either County Court or High Court.

Like in Criminal Court, if the verdict is not agreed with you can appeal. Again, the case will be reviewed and the decision could be changed.

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Civil Courts - Appeals Courts

The Civil Appeal is different to Criminal Appeal, but the rout that is taken still depends on the same things:

  • Whether the case was tried in County Court or High Court
  • The reason for appeal

This is the way it works:

  • High Court - for appeals from County Court
  • Court of Appeal (Civil Division) - for appeals from High Court
  • Supreme Court - for further appeal from the Court of Appeal
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