Multi-Store Model

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  • Created by: laura
  • Created on: 13-04-12 20:50

Multi-Store Model

Atkinson and Shiffrin's Multistore Model of Memory 1968

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Atkinson and Shiffrin's Multistore Model of Memory suggests that there are three separate memory stores, Sensory Memory (sometimes called the 'sensory store'), Short Term Memory (STM) and Long Term Memory (LTM). Each store has a different duration, capacity and mode of encoding (the way that information is stored - e.g., visual, acoustic, semantic).

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Encoding, Duration and Capacity.

Atkinson and Shiffrin's Multistore Model of Memory 1968


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Sensory Memory

Atkinson and Shiffrin's Multistore Model of Memory 1968

Sensory Memory:

Holds information very briefly. Each sensory modality has its own store.

Coding = Modality Specific (can be visual, acoustic, tactile, etc. depending on the sense being used)

Capacity = Difficult to test, thought to be quite large

Duration = 1.2 seconds

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Short Term Memory

Atkinson and Shiffrin's Multistore Model of Memory 1968

Short Term Memory:

 Limited capacity, can only store information for a few seconds.

 

Coding = Thought to be acoustic (due to studies such as Conrad) but may depend on task.

Capacity = 7 ± 2 items or chunks

Duration = Between 15 and 30 second


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Long Term Memory

Atkinson and Shiffrin's Multistore Model of Memory 1968

Long Term Memory:

Can store vast amounts of information (unlimited capacity?) for very long periods of time.

Coding = Semantic

Capacity = Very large

Duration = A very long time, but difficult to test

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Evaluation Of The Multi-Store Model

Atkinson and Shiffrin's Multistore Model of Memory 1968

Strengths:

  • High in face validity

Weaknesses:

Case studies of brain damaged participants such as Clive Wearing show that the Multistore Model is an oversimplification of how memory actually works. Clive Wearing suffered brain damage to many brain areas, including his hippocampi, when the herpes simplex virus attacked his brain. Clive was similar to H.M. in that he could not remember new information for more than a few seconds; however, he could learn new skills. This suggests that there is a separate long term memory for skills (Procedural Memory). Clive could also remember facts about his life prior to the illness, but could not remember any experiences. This meant that repeatedly had revelations that he was conscious for the first time. This suggests that there are separate long term memory stores for facts (semantic memory) and experiences (episodic memory).

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Comments

Sarah

Great notes! Im confused though because I thought clivewearing and the case study of HM supported the MSM as they have problems with STM but not LTM showing that they are separate stores as MSM suggests?

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