English lit - Hawk roosting

  • Created by: k.yllle
  • Created on: 23-10-18 22:03

content

I sit in the top of the wood, my eyes closed'

  • The hawk is thinking about his place in creation which is represented by his high physical position in the trees

'Or in sleep rehearse perfect kills and eat'

  • His power is always present as he doesn't relax when he is asleep.
  • The bird is a metaphor for people who kill and how completely absorbed in the power they are 
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context

  • He wrote many poems about violence in the natural world
  • He often used the brutality for animals to represent how humans are brutal to gain power
  • Hughes believed that spirits lived inside nature
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narration

'The airs buoyancy and the sun's ray/Are of advantage to me/ And the earth's face upward for my inspection'

  • It is first person and narrated by the hawk
  • He is very egotistical and believes nature is only there to help him
  • The hyperbole shows he is arrogant 

'Now i hold creation in my foot'

  • He thinks he is better than God 
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devices

'Between my hooked head and hooked feet'

  • He is a weapon from head to toe

'My manners are tearing off heads'

  • creates an arrogant and sinister tone as describes graphic words as manners

'The allotment of death'

  • Imagery suggests mass death and suggests a graveyard which makes the hawk sound like a serial killer
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structure

  • Regular form adds to it's strength as the words are calculated like the hawk

'The sun is behind me'

  • Short sentence suggests he is superior to the sun and he believes it supports him

Stanzas reflect his thought process

  • The first two stanzas focus on his physical and literal superiority'high trees'
  • Middle stanzas focus on creation and his god-like power 'It is all mine'
  • The final stanzas are about his killing and justifying his actions 'No arguments assert my right'
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