Elizabeth, James and Charles important events

history.

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Adam
  • Created on: 19-01-13 11:29

Elizabeth I - Finance, Poor and Foregin Policy

Finance & the poor

  • War with Spain - cost £4million - Leads to higher taxes + poor soldiers
  • Stopping Tyrone's rebellion in Ireland - cost  £1/2 million
  • Sells crown land to pay war costs - less future finance + hides true cost of war
  • 1598 - Act of Husbandry and tillage
  • 1600 - Formation of the East India Company - becoming a trading nation - more revenue
  • 1601 - Poor Law Act - lasts for over 250 years
  • 1601 - Golden speech - gave up right to give Monopolies
  • Only left a very small debt despite £4.5 million cost of wars - £100,000

Foreign Policy

  • Tyrone rebellion - Essex failed to stop it - Mountjoy victorious in 1601
  • War with Spain - large financial cost
  • Secured Spanish Netherlands + assisted France - potential ally
  • No threat of Spanish invasion in 1601

 

1 of 5

James I - Finance and Foreign Policy

Finance

  • Debt left by Elizabeth small - under £100,000
  • Tax farms - guaranteed fixed revenue (but less than potential revenue)
  • Expenditure of servants and courtiers rose by 60% - wished to appear generous.
  • Book of bounty - kept record of Kings spending - attempted to restrain it
  • 1610 - Great Contract - ended in failure
  • 1614 - Cockayne project - Failed miserably
  • Cranfield efficient and useful asset - impeached

Foreign Policy

  • 1604 - Treaty of London
  • 1613 - Cleves Julich - Beati pacifici - Blessed are the peace makers
  • 1618 - 30 years war - didn't involve himself in it - trying to keep England at peace
  • Dynastic Marriages - Spanish marriage failure
  • 1621 - Parliament putting pressure for Spanish war - rips page out of commons journal - Parliament shouldn't be discussing foreign policy
  • 1624 - Gave into Parliament - War with Spain begins
2 of 5

Elizabeth I - Religion, Parliament and Monarchy

Religion

  • 1591 - Proclamation against Jesuits
  • 1593 - Act against Seditious Sectaries
  • 1603 - Group of Seminary priests accept Elizabeth as head of state

Parliament

  • 1601 - Failure of Essex' rebellion
  • 1601 - Golden speech - Although successful in gaining subsidy, lowered crown power and raised Parliamentary power
  • Willing to punish members of Parliament - shows control

Monarchy

  • The 'Virgin queen'
  • Essex rebellion - old favourite of the queen
  • Golden speech quells Parliaments concerns
3 of 5

James I - Religion, Parliament and Monarchy

Religion

  • 1604 - Hampton court conference - Increased James' Puritan popularity
  • 1605 - Gunpowder plot - Reacted well - wasn't too harsh on Catholics
  • 1611 - King James Bible - Lasted
  • 1618 - Declaration of Sports - disliked by Puritan + wasn't enforced

Parliament

  • 1610 - Divine right speech - No business finished (correct to dissolves it though)
  • 1614 - Addled Parliament
  • 1618 - Differences over 30 year war
  • 1621 - 24 - (In FP) pressure into eventual war with Spain

Monarchy

  • Scottish favourites - Carr killed Overbury - Carr given only 6 years - Hostile reaction
  • Elevation of Buckingham - lead to Cranfield impeachment + bad for Charles
  • Large number of gifts - bad for finance

   

4 of 5

Charles I

  • 1625 - Promotes Arminianism - Lets Laud give an Arminianism sermon
    -Tonnage and Poundage - only granted for 1 year
  • 1626 - Attempted impeachment of Buckingham
    - Charles dissolves parliament to stop impeachment - shows higher parliamentary influence
    - Forced loan - No parliament to grant king subsidies - however, can't object either
    - Buckingham leads Cadiz expedition - failure
  • 1627 - Buckingham encourages war against France - not enough money for it
    - La Rochelle (Ille De Re) expedition fails
    - 5 Knights case - Narrowly lost (7 votes to 5)
  • 1628 - Assassination of Buckingham - Parliament cheer to the news - King isn't happy by their reaction
    - Petition of right
  • 1629 - Start of personal rule - Speaker held down and 3 resolutions
5 of 5

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all British monarchy - Tudors and Stuarts resources »