Churchill

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Churchill - political

"consolidation rather than innovation was the order of the day" - Seldon

"Golden Age" - Hennessey (1951-73)

Churchill, The right road for Britian - in 1949 the first general statement of party policies was produced that became the foundation oof the 1951 manifesto. Promised to protect the welfare state and not to undo any of Churchill's reforms. 

In terms of the Trade unions, Churchill was appeasing. His Minister for Labour, Monckton, was nicknamed the Minister for Labour. 1954 railway dispute, made concessions

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Churchill - Economic

Inflation 1951 - 9.1%     1955 - 4.5%

Inductrial production in France was 3x higher, and in Grance it was 4x

No longer term planning, decreased bank rate in 1952 and 1953, only to rise again in 1954 and 1955 to 4.5%

Inherited a -£700m BOP turned it into a +£259m 1952

The term Butskellism was formed, commentators used ther term to portray how Butler (COE) and his Labour Counterpart were interchangeable, eg operating a mixed economy and welfare state. O'Morgan argues that perhaps 'Butskellism' did not exist and was a "state of mind". Butler favoured economic control through interest rates. Gaitskell preferred taxation and government direction. 

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Churchill - Social

Rationing ended in 1954

1954 opened the first purpose built comprehensive school, Kidbrooke

Real wages increased, by 2.2% 1951-55

Manifesto pledged to build 300,000 houses a year. c.350,000 1954 (minister of housing - Macmillan) 1954 gov increased housing subsidary from £33 to £35

Expenditure on social services increased from 39.2% GDP to 43% in 1955

consumerism 1951 2million car, 1964 8 million

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International

Lynch, "Britain was a clinet of the USA" 1947 Marshall plan, Europe offered $15bn, Britain 10% of that. Therefore America had a lot of economic influence over Britain.

1953 Korean war ended

1952 A bomb

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