Bowlby

6 point rule:

1) Bowlby (1940s)

2) Evolution of attachments

3) Internal working model -Freud

4) Parental response + social releasers +attachment

5) Monotropy

6) Critical period(24 months) -Lorenz

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Research supporting Bowlby-Internal working model

There is evidence to support Bowlby's theory, this is hodges and tizard's research.

Hodges and tizard's research found that children whio didn't have a clear attachment figure in early childhood found peer relationships more difficult in later life.

This relates to Bowlby's theory as he said that attachment figures generate expectations for all future relationships. This is called the internal working model.

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Research supporting Bowlby-Monotropy

There is evidence to support Bowlby's theory.

Shaffer and Emerson found that although a child has a few attachment figures one is always the primary caregiver.

This relates to Bowlby's theory as it supporrts monotropy, this is the concept fot he infant having one strong attachment.

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Research supporting Bowlby-Comparitive research

There is evidence to support Bowlby's theory.

Lorenz found that there was a critical period in geese.

This relates to Bowlby's theory as he stated the critical period for humans was 2 years, this is comparitive research.

Howvever, there are problems with comparitive research as humans act differentley to animals and therefore, the results aren't always generalisable to both.

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Research contradicting Bowlby-Monotropy

There is evidence to contradict Bowlby's theory.

Rutter, 1995, said that psychologists often see the different attachments a child has as equally important.

This contradicts Bowlby's idea of monotropy this is the infant having one strong attachment.

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