AQA GCSE Sociology: Unit One: Topic - Education - Different Types Of Schools

These revision cards cover the different types of schools in the UK.
The cards will provide you with examples of such schools, who attends such schools, what body funds such schools and the main ethos of such schools.

Enjoy :L

LUKE :D 

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  • Created by: Luke (:
  • Created on: 22-06-11 13:36

Education: Different Types Of Schools

DIFFERENT TYPES OF SCHOOLS

1. Comprehensive Schools

2. City Academies

3. Faith Schools

4. Grammar Schools

5. Independant Schools

6. Special Schools

LUKE! ;D

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1. Comprehensive schools

An Example of a comprehensive school is…

Marshland High School

Who runs/ funds these types of schools?

The Government

Which pupils are they for?

Most Comprehensive secondary school’s are for 11 – 16 year olds. In some places there are comprehensive middle schools

What is the ethos (guiding principle) of these schools?

To help pupils acquire knowledge, skills and understanding, and to imply them in demanding and challenging situations. To insure that every student cultivates a reasoned set of values and beliefs based on a caring, considerate and respectful attitude to others. To encourage good learning habits; including hard work, commitment and self-discipline. 

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2. City academies

An Example of a comprehensive school is…

The Dixons City Academy in Bradford.

Who runs/funds these types of schools?

Private sponsors can give up to £2million in order for a high amount of control over the school, but the academies are set up with the backing of the local authority and are state funded.

Which pupils are they for?

They are for all-ability students from any background

What is the ethos (guiding principle) of these schools?

To give the students the best quality education possible through means such as technology and provide a safe environment for children to develop their self esteems. 

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3. Faith schools

Who runs/ funds these types of schools?

Faith schools are usually funded by their LA, the same as many other maintained schools. In most cases, the faith organisation will have supplied the land on which the school is built.

Which pupils are they for?

Faith schools are mainly for the pupils, who are members of that particular religion, however students who do not follow that particular belief can still attend.

What is the ethos (guiding principle) of these schools?

The main ethos of Faith schools, such as The Krishna-Avanti Voluntary Aided Primary School is to offer an education based on religion, practicing the traditions, yet following the national syllabus.

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4. Grammar Schools

An Example of a comprehensive school is…

‘Kesteven & Gantham Girls’ School

 Who runs/ funds these types of schools?

It is state school so it is run by the government.

 Which pupils are they for?

They are for the more academically gifted pupils. The admission is based upon the 11+ procedure

 What is the ethos (guiding principle) of these schools?

The aims are to provide a learning environment that is both stimulating and supportive, enabling every student to develop fully their intellectual and personal qualities and to obtain knowledge, skills and confidence throughout the rest of their life.

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5. Independent Schools

Who runs/ funds these types of school?

Parents of the children attending pay a fee each school term.

Which pupils are they for?

Primary school students, GCSE and A-Level students.

What is the ethos (guiding principle) of these schools?

Working with its member to promote and preserve the quality, diversity and excellence of UK independent education both at home and abroad.

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6. Special Schools

Who runs/ funds these types of school?

Special schools can be state funded or charge the parents of students attending a fee each term.

Which pupils are they for?

Special Schools are set up as a place for people (aged 4 – 35) with special educational needs to learn, they teach students lessons for life as opposed to complicated sciences etc. Special schools work at a slower rate to ensure the lessons taught sink in.  

 

What is the ethos (guiding principle) of these schools?

'The ultimate aim is for a child to be as independent as possible and to be able to transfer skills to different situations. Everything is so positive even if learning is slow and limited every child benefits from intensive interaction. They get quality of life on a daily basis.' - Extracted from The Good Schools Guide - Special Educational Needs review of Rainbow School for Autistic Children, London.

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