Yeats Chronology

This has dates of important dates throughout Yeats' life and career.

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  • Created by: kira
  • Created on: 13-05-12 08:31
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Yeats-Chronology
1865: On 13th June, Yeats was born in Dublin.
1867: Yeats family move to Regents Park in London. They have holidays in Sligo on the west
coast of Ireland.
1881: Family moves back to Ireland.
1886: `The Stolen Child' was written.
1889: Yeats meets Maud Gonne.
1891: Yeats proposes to Maud Gonne.
1894: Yeats has his first serious affair with Mrs Olivia Shakespear.
1899: Proposes to Maud Gonne again.
1900: Proposes to Maud Gonne. Yeats' mother dies.
1901: Yeats proposes again.
1903: Maud Gonne marries John MacBride. Irish National Theatre Society formed with Yeats
as president.
1904: Abbey Theatre opens.
1911: Meets future wife Georgie Hyde-Lees.
1912: `The Cold Heaven' was written.
1914: `September 1913' was written. First World War begins.
1916: `The Wild Swans at Coole' was written. `The Fisherman' was written in February.
`Easter 1916' was written. Easter Rising: there was the execution of rebels including some of
Yeats' friends. Yeats proposes to Maud Gonne after her husband was executed.
1917: `Broken Dreams' was published. Yeats proposes to Iseult Gonne, Maud Gonne's
daughter. Marries Georgie Hyde-Lees.
1918: `An Irish Airman Foresees his Death' was written.
1919: `The Cat and the Moon' was written. `The Second Coming' was written. Yeats'
daughter, Anne, was born.
1921: Yeats' son was born.

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Yeats won the Nobel Prize for Literature. `Leda and the Swan' written. The Civil War
ends.
1927: `In memory of Eva Gore-Booth and Con Markiewicz' written. `Among School Children'
was written.
1928: `Sailing to Byzantium' was published.
1938: `The Man and the Echo' published.
1939: Yeats dies. World War Two begins.…read more

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orla


I was trying to make my own but thank you for doing the hard work for me!

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