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Isabella has died, and so Edgar returns to Thrushcross Grange, with his
half-orphaned nephew, Linton- a "pale, delicate, effeminate, boy" and "sickly
peevishness" in both his appearance and character.
A total opposite to Linton; Catherine Linton, is excitable and eagerly
anticipates in seeing her cousin. She took to babying him when she saw
that he was sickly and emotionally fragile, "she resolved to make a pet of
her little cousin." However, "he dried his eyes, and lightened in a faint
smile." Seeing Linton respond to Catherine's kindness positively, Edgar
shows some optimism towards nurturing his sincere nephew- "The company
of a child of his own age will instil new spirit into him soon,"
Nelly though, soon frets how would Linton cope if he were ordered to live
with Heathcliff and Hareton at Wuthering Heights- "however will that
weakling live at Wuthering Heights, between his father and Hareton? What
playmates and instructors they'll be."
That very evening, Joseph came and demanded the child for Heathcliff, he
was after all his son. Ellen told him Edgar was asleep, but he went into his
room and insisted on being given Linton. Edgar wished to keep Linton at the
Grange (this was Isabella's dying wish), but reluctantly he knew they could
not legally claim him, so he could only put it off till the next morning. "The
very exhibition of any desire to keep him would have rendered the claimant
more peremptory: there was nothing left but to resign him."…read more

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Analysis
· The between Cathy and her cousin Linton is very strong: she is energetic and warm-
hearted, whereas he is limp and parasitic. Edgar purposefully takes Catherine on a
walk and warns her he isn't as energetic as she is, "your cousin is not as strong or so
merry as you are...don't expect him to play and run about with you directly."
· Perhaps a symbol of both Linton's fragility and Catherine's fondness of her cousin
(whom she has never met) is "a beautiful lock of his hair; it was lighter than mine-
more flaxen, and quite as fine. I have it carefully preserved in a little glass box". The
description of is hair is feminine and delicate, which in turn compliments its
preservation in a glass box- transparent and potentially fragile as a material; finally
the hair being preserved/protected in this way, highlights Catherine's affection
towards Linton as a cousin, she is an only child and the so the fact that she has a
cousin is particularly important to her. "Catherine ran wild with joy at the idea of
welcoming her father back; and indulged most sanguine anticipations of the
innumerable excellences of her `real' cousin".
· It is interesting to see how Brontë distributes conventionally masculine and feminine
characteristics among her characters without regard for gender. Linton is pointedly
described as being delicate, with fine flaxen hair even lighter than Cathy's: he is the
helpless "lady" of the two, who cries when he doesn't get his way, and allows himself
to be "courted" by his female cousin.
· Some parallels in characteristics with the young Catherine Linton and her deceased
mother Catherine Earnshaw when she was a child. The involvement with nature/ the
moors and her free spirited excitable character; "strolled leisurely over the swells and
hollows of mossy turf, under the shadow of the trees...tried to wait patiently, but that
was impossible: she couldn't be still a minute." And their sensitivity towards crying;
"You'll make her weep too- see how sorry she is for you!"- "it seldom happened that
she would keep you company, and oblige you to be quiet that you might comfort her."
· Relationship between Catherine and Edgar is strong- "Miss Cathy shrieked, and
stretched out her arms, as soon as se caught her father's face looking from the
window."
· A comparison made between Linton and Edgar- "A pale, delicate, effeminate boy,
who might have been taken for my master's younger brother, so strong was the
resemblance"…read more

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Gothic Genre elements
· Use of the colour black- "A LETTER, edged with black"
· Reference to mourning- "attired in her new black frock poor thing"
· Locks of hair- "a beautiful lock of his hair"
· Carriages
· Sickly children- "sickly peevishness in his aspect" and "his health is very precarious"
· Tears
· Shyness- "shrinking from Catherine's salute"
· Vulnerability "however will that weakling live at Wuthering Heights"
· Sour faces and religious/church clothing- "donned in his Sunday garments, with his
sanctimonious and sourest face"
· Sorrow- "an expression of exceeding sorrow overcast his features"
· "grieved bitterly"
· Objectifying children- "have rendered the claimant more peremptory: there was
nothing left but to resign him"…read more

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Some Key quotes
· "Catherine ran wild with joy at the idea of welcoming her father back; and indulged most sanguine
anticipations of the innumerable excellences of her `real' cousin"
· "her aunt's death impressed her with no definite sorrow"
· "might have been taken for my master's younger brother, so strong was the resemblance: but
there was a sickly peevishness in his aspect that Edgar Linton never had."
· "She's fond if you already; and mind you don't grieve her by crying tonight"
· "She resolved to make a pet of her little cousin"
· "The company of a child of his own age will instil new spirit into him soon, and by wishing for
strength he'll gain it"
· "however will that weakling live at Wuthering Heights, between his father and Hareton? What
playmates and instructors they'll be."
· "He was donned in his Sunday garments, with his most sanctimonious ad sourest face"
· "Hathecliff has send me for his lad, un Aw munn't goa back `baht him."
· "he would have pitied the child on his own account; but, recalling Isabella's hopes and fears, and
anxious wishes for her son, and her commendations of him to his care, he grieved bitterly"
· "There was nothing left but to resign him."
· "Tell Mr Heathcliff...that his son shall come to Wuthering Heights tomorrow."…read more

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