GCSE English literature AQA Lord Of The Flies Chapters 3 and 4

Notes on Lord Of The Flies, significance of characters and author's use of language

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Preview of GCSE English literature AQA Lord Of The Flies Chapters 3 and 4

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Lord of the Flies
Chapter 3 and 4: main events
Chapter 3:
Jack attempts to hunt
Ralph and Simon attempt to build huts, other boys help with the first, fewer the second,
just Ralph and Simon for third
Jack and Ralph fight on the beach -> first argument
Simon finds clearing ­ separates himself from the other boys
Chapter 4:
Mirages and nightmares
Roger throws rocks at Henry ->
"Yet there was a space round Henry, perhaps six yards in diameter, into which he dare
not throw. Here, invisible yet strong, was the taboo of the old life. Round the squatting
child was the protection of parents and school and policemen and the law."
Ralph sees ship but no fire
Ralph and Jack fight
Jack hunts pig (paints his face)
Symbolism of Roger's part in Chapter 3 and 4
"Roger led the way straight through the castles, kicking them over, burying the flowers,
scattering the chosen stones." ­ Roger showing his savage side, immediately starting to
kick over the castles that the littluns made, beginning of the descent into savagery.
"Maurice still felt the unease of wrong-doing... Roger remained." ­ Roger does not show
that he feels any guilt for what he did, becoming more and more savage, bullying the
littluns to feel superiority.
"...picked up a stone, aimed, and threw it at Henry ­ threw it to miss." ­ even though he
doesn't know it, he still feels the pressure of civilisation and is afraid to actually hurt
Henry.
"Yet there was a space round Henry, perhaps six yards in diameter, into which he dare
not throw. Here, invisible yet strong, was the taboo of the old life. Round the squatting
child was the protection of parents and school and policemen and the law." ­ he could
not bring himself to throw at the boy. This is contrasted with the disregard for civilisation
later in the book.
Roger symbolises the pure savagery in the boys, showing the instinct for civilisation slowly
disappearing and giving way for murder, violence and torture.
Golding's use of language
"Down like a sprinter" ­ simile, descriptive, fast-paced to reflect the action
"Two continents of experience and feeling, unable to communicate" ­ metaphor, showing
Ralph and Jack starting not to talk, arguing
"Baffled, in love and hate" ­ Antithesis, Ralph and Jack confused about if they liked the way
the other was
"The whole space was walled with dark aromatic bushes" ­ descriptive, building a picture and
plays on senses (smell) in readers
"Strange things happened at midday" ­ statement of fact, said in a way to suggest boys now
thought this was fact too
"Like a myriad of tiny teeth in a saw, the transparencies came scavenging." ­ simile,
descriptive, imagery
"He looked in astonishment, no longer at himself but at an awesome stranger." ­ `awesome'
because it surprised him, `stranger' because he could not even recognise himself
"His laughter became a bloodthirsty snarling" ­ description, senses (sound), foreshadowing
what Jack is to become
"Sleek and streaming like a seal" ­ simile, sibilance, description
"Taken away its life like a long satisfying drink" ­ simile, Jack's joy and satisfaction at killing a

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