AS English Lang/Lit full Anthology 2012 WJEC

This is the complete english lang/lit anthology for the WJEC exam board.

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AS English Language & Literature: LL1: Section A Poetry pre1900 Anthology
(For examination from January 2012)
INTRODUCTION
This anthology has been compiled to introduce you to the rich poetic tradition in the English
language up to 1900, and to provide an overview of some important literary and linguistic
developments. It is expected that you will have read all the poems in this anthology in
preparation for LL1 Section A.
The questions in LL1 Section A will assess your ability to:
· select and apply relevant concepts and approaches from integrated linguistic and literary
study, using appropriate terminology and accurate, coherent written expression (AO1)
· demonstrate detailed critical understanding in analysing the ways in which structure, form
and language shape meanings in a range of spoken and written texts (AO2)
· use integrated approaches to explore relationships between texts, analysing and evaluating
the significance of contextual factors in their production and reception (AO3) when exploring
relationships between a printed poem from this anthology and an unseen text.
The anthology is arranged chronologically to demonstrate the way language and poetic forms
have evolved. The poems have been selected from different sources, with attention paid to
finding poems closest to the original texts. However, in some instances the most accessible
or familiar versions have been chosen.
When reading poetry from before 1900, it is worth remembering that Standard English as we
know it today did not exist then. Until the introduction of Caxton's printing press in the early
1470s, most texts were handwritten, and there were both regional and personal variations in
orthography, grammar and lexis. Many shorthand techniques existed to save expensive
vellum, including the use of the macron and the ampersand. These continued even after the
advent of printing on paper. Orthography, too, was not fixed, even after the publication of Dr
Samuel Johnson's dictionary in 1755. Writers in the Middle English period used some
graphemes (letters) that are no longer used. An interesting example of this is the use of Y as
in Ye Olde Shoppe. This letter is a corruption of the old AngloSaxon runic letter (þ) called the
thorn and pronounced th, and its use persisted into the Early Modern period. In most modern
versions of pre1900 poetry the linguistic features of the texts have been standardised.
Punctuation is usually modernised. To make a true judgement of the linguistic features of a
particular period, you should read facsimiles of the original poems.
When discussing the syntax of poetry, you should also bear in mind that this can be affected
by the scansion of the line and the dictates of a rhyming pattern.
The choice of poetry before 1900 is incredibly varied and the poems in this collection
represent a small proportion of those available. Most of the poems in this anthology can be
found in any good collection of poetry, such as The New Oxford Book of Verse, or can be
accessed on the Internet. The University of Toronto website has an excellent collection of
verse with some helpful biographical information and footnotes at:
www.library.utoronto.ca/utel/rp
You may find it useful to explore the poems in thematic groups, comparing the different ways
that poets from different periods have dealt with some universal subjects.
Chief Examiner

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WJEC AS English Language & Literature LL1: Section A
Poetry pre1900 Anthology (For examination from January 2012)
CONTENTS
1. LOVE THAT DOTH REIGN AND LIVE WITHIN MY THOUGHT
Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (15171547)
2. NEW PRINCE, NEW POMP
Robert Southwell (15611595)
3. SONNET CXXX
William Shakespeare (15641616)
4. SONNET: BATTER MY HEART
John Donne (15721631)
5. TO VIRGINS TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME
Robert Herrick (15911674)
6. SONNET XIX: ON HIS BLINDNESS
John Milton (16081674)
7.…read more

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LOVE THAT DOTH REIGN AND LIVE WITHIN MY THOUGHT
Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (15171547)
Love that doth reign and live within my thought,
And built his seat within my captive breast,
Clad in the arms wherein with me he fought,
Oft in my face he doth his banner rest.
But she that taught me love and suffer pain,
My doubtful hope and eke my hot desire
With shamefast look to shadow and refrain,
Her smiling grace converteth straight to ire.…read more

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NEW PRINCE, NEW POMP
Robert Southwell (15611595)
Behold, a seely tender babe
In freezing winter night
In homely manger trembling lies,
Alas, a piteous sight!
The inns are full, no man will yield
This little pilgrim bed,
But forced he is with seely beasts
In crib to shroud his head.
Despise him not for lying there,
First, what he is enquire,
An orient pearl is often found
In depth of dirty mire.…read more

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SONNET CXXX
William Shakespeare (15641616)
My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun
Coral is far more red, than her lips' red,
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun:
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head:
I have seen roses damask'd, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks
And in some perfumes is there more delight,
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.…read more

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SONNET: BATTER MY HEART
John Donne (15721631)
Batter my heart, threeperson'd God for, you
As yet but knocke, breathe, shine, and seeke to mend
That I may rise, and stand, o'erthrow mee, and bend
Your force, to breake, blowe, burn, and make mee new.
I, like an usurpt towne, to another due,
Labour to admit you, but Oh, to no end,
Reason your viceroy in mee, mee should defend,
But is captiv'd, and proves weake or untrue.…read more

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TO VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME
Robert Herrick (15911674)
Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still aflying:
And this same flower that smiles today,
Tomorrow will be dying.
The glorious lamp of heaven, the Sun,
The higher he's agetting
The sooner will his race be run,
And nearer he's to setting.
The age is best, which is the first,
When youth and blood are warmer
But being spent, the worse, and worst
Times still succeed the former.…read more

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SONNET XIX: ON HIS BLINDNESS
John Milton (16081674)
When I consider how my light is spent,
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodged with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide,
"Doth God exact daylabour, light denied?"
I fondly ask.…read more

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THE MOWER AGAINST GARDENS
Andrew Marvell (16211678)
Luxurious man, to bring his vice in use,
Did after him the world seduce
And from the fields the flowers and plants allure,
Where Nature was most plain and pure.
He first enclosed within the garden's square
A dead and standing pool of air,
And a more luscious earth for them did knead,
Which stupefied them while it fed.
The pink grew then as double as his mind
The nutriment did change the kind.…read more

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