Theory of Planned Behaviour

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  • Theory of Planned Behaviour
    • This is a cognitive theory concerning the decision to engage in a particular behaviour. According to this theory, an individual's decision to engage in a behaviour can be directly predicted by their behavioural intentions.
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      • Personal attitudes
        • How desirable the behaviour seems to be. This is based on beliefs about the consequences of performing the behaviour.
      • Subjective norms
        • The individual's perception of how others would view the behaviour and the individual's motivation to confrom to social norms
      • Perceived behavioural control
        • The extent to which the individual believes that the behaviour is achievable. This can act on the intention to behave in a certain way, or directly on the behaviour itself.
          • Intention
            • The individual's perception of how others would view the behaviour and the individual's motivation to confrom to social norms
            • How desirable the behaviour seems to be. This is based on beliefs about the consequences of performing the behaviour.
            • Behaviour
    • Evaluation
      • Many studies have shown that intentions can be predicted from the three components of the TPB. A meta-analysis found that perceived behavioural control added an extra 6% of the variance in intention compared to the assessment of attitude and subjective norms alone
      • The TPB has been criticised for being too rational, failing to take into account emotions, compulsions or other irrational determinants of behaviour. The presence of strong emotions can help to explain why people sometimes act irrationally by failing to carry out an intended behaviour even when it is in their best interests to do so.
      • A meta-analysis of studies using the TPB found that the model was successful in predicting intention to change rather than actual behavioural change. This pattern of results are generally found in the prediction of health behaviours that involve the adoption of difficult behavioural change projects, such as stopping drugs. This suggests that the TPB is primarily an account of intention formation rather than specifying the process involved in translating the intention into action.

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