Themes in Jane Eyre 2

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  • Created by: Pascale
  • Created on: 11-05-13 09:58
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  • Themes in Jane Eyre
    • Gender
      • Role of men
        • 'Habitually obedient to John'
          • John Reed is the 'man of the house' at Gateshead - Jane submits to this mostly
        • "Say, 'What do you want, Master Reed?'"
        • "we must be married" - St. John
          • St. John 'decides' to take Jane as a wife
          • "Refuse to be my wife, and you limit yourself for ever to a track of selfish ease and barren obscurity." - St. John
            • The belief that without men, women were nothing
        • "I summon you as my wife" - Rochester
          • 'summon' - command, order, duty
          • Women's place to please men
      • Role of women
        • Feminist criticism
          • 'The heroine of the novel Jane Eyre has successfully demonstrated the image of a woman who is intelligent, independent, kind-hearted and most importantly, brave enough to say “no” to the social conventions and live up to her principle in life.'
        • A thinking woman was considered such a breach of nature that a Harvard doctor reported during his autopsy on a Radcliffe graduate he discovered that her uterus had shriveled to the size of a pea" (Gilbert 2032)
        • "It does good to no woman to be flattered by her superior"
          • Woman treated like children - in such a way that men can get the best out of them
        • 'As if loveliness were not the special prerogative of woman'
          • Expectations of women
            • '"No sight so sad as that of a naughty child," he began, "especially a naughty little girl."' - Brocklehurst
              • Men were given more allowances
        • '"No sight so sad as that of a naughty child," he began, "especially a naughty little girl."' - Brocklehurst
          • Men were given more allowances
        • "I should wish her to be brought up in a manner suiting her prospects...to be made useful, to be kept humble" - Mrs. Reed
          • It was expected of Jane to be subservient to men
          • 'humble' is contradictory to the word 'prospects'
        • Women depended upon men physically, financially and spiritually.
          • "A poor blind man, whom you will have to lead about by the hand?"  - Rochester "Yes, sir." - Jane
          • "I am independent, sir, as well as rich: I am my own mistress." - Jane "And will you stay with me?" - Rochester "Certainly" - Jane
          • Jane defies social convention and marries a man who is physically and financially dependent on her. Possibly even spiritually after her 'pilgrimage'
    • Love
      • St. John
        • "I scorn your idea of love" - Jane
          • Love for utility not feelings or romance
        • "undoubtedly enough of love would follow" - St. John
          • Puts his own aims ahead of Jane's feelings
        • 'He seemed to say..."I love you [Rosamond] ...but that heart i already laid on a sacred altar"'
          • St. John puts religion ahead of his feelings and true, even reciprocated love for Rosamond
          • Is his love for God greater than his romantic love for Rosamond? - Jesus is his wife in a sense
      • Rochester
        • '[Jane's] blanks of existence were filled up'
          • Rochester completes Jane
          • Essential in her life - without him she'd be incomplete
        • 'If I had loved him less I should have thought his accent and look of exultation savage'
          • Jane sees flaws in Rochester but loves him despite these things
          • Neither Rochester nor Jane are attractive
        • 'I saw nothing: but I heard a voice somewhere cry--- “Jane! Jane! Jane!.....And it was a voice of a human being--- a known, loved, well-known voice– that of Edward Fairfax Rochester; and it spoke in pain and woe wildly, eerily, urgently.'
          • After St. John's proposal
          • Spiritual connection to Rochester?
          • St. John
            • "I scorn your idea of love" - Jane
              • Love for utility not feelings or romance
            • "undoubtedly enough of love would follow" - St. John
              • Puts his own aims ahead of Jane's feelings
            • 'He seemed to say..."I love you [Rosamond] ...but that heart i already laid on a sacred altar"'
              • St. John puts religion ahead of his feelings and true, even reciprocated love for Rosamond
              • Is his love for God greater than his romantic love for Rosamond? - Jesus is his wife in a sense
          • 'True love'?
    • Elements
      • Fire
        • "You are cold, because no contact strikes the fire from you that is in you." - Gypsy aka Rochester
          • Rochester's desire for a passionate relationship with Jane
          • Sees that Jane is passionate in other respects
        • "Don't keep me long; the fire scorches me" - Jane
        • '"Come, Miss Jane, don't cry,"...She might as well have said to the fire "don't burn!"'
          • Jane feels it is impossible for her to suppress her emotions
      • Ice
        • 'bitter cold' (Lowood)
          • Bronte's critique of these institutions
          • The fiery and passionate Jane is suppressed at Lowood
        • 'This room was chill, because it seldom had a fire' (The red-room)
          • Jane's passion confined
          • Contrast to red
          • Where her uncle died - cold, still air, haunting, lifeless
        • 'ice of reserve' (describing St. John's nature)
          • St. John is dispassionate
          • 'ice' solid state - Jane doesn't see that with marrying him, love will follow. She believes that he will always be this way
          • 'reserve' perhaps St. John isn't really like this - ignores his feelings for Rosamond, keeps reserved
        • "I am cold" - St. John
          • "Whereas I am hot, and fire dissolves ice."
            • Nature wouldn't allow them to be together
        • 'He [Rochester] would sometimes pass me haughtily and coldly'
          • Rochester in denial for his passionate feelings for Jane
        • “death-white realms” - Bewick's History of British Birds
          • Represent Jane's physical and spiritual isolation at Gateshead
    • Rochester as Jane's master and pupil
      • 'I was then his vision'
        • Sight, vision, wisdom, perception
      • 'my master'
        • Serves Rochester and knows her place
        • Jane has this level of respect for Rochester despite their romantic relationship - still considers herself a governess
      • 'wild beast... dangerous'
        • Jane 'tames' Rochester
      • "I meant, however, to be a bigamist" - Rochester
        • Jane is Rochester's moral superior - will not marry him on the grounds that it is not morally sound
    • Bildungsroman
      • Jane Eyre is a typical Bildungsroman in the sense that it begins with her as a child and she works her way up in life
      • 'Bewick's History of British Birds'
        • Jane is fascinated with the idea of flight beyond an oppressive situation
      • "A man could rise through his own exertions he had control over his destiny" - Patricia Alden
        • Specifically named 'man' - Bronte defied this and allowed Jane social mobility
      • Novel is like a pilgrimage - The Pilgrims' Progress
        • Gateshead - Lowood - Helen Burns, Miss Temple, Mr Brocklehurst. Thornfield, Moor House - St. John, Diana and Mary, Thornfield
      • 'There was no possibility of taking a walk that day'
        • Obstructive movement and confinement from external conditions - possibility of future release 'that day'
      • Social mobility, self improvement, social improvement
      • Victorian ideas that one must be married - Bronte is reluctant to fulfill this
      • "Mobility was not really a choice when "standing still" amounted to slipping down into working class" - Patricia Alden
      • Bronte finally submits to the Victorian belief that a woman's place is in the house - anti bildungsroman? Aspirations - housewife
      • German - formation novel
    • Jane as a narrator
      • "Jane, I don't like cavillers or questioners"
        • Jane doesn't introduce herself to the reader - we find out her name by default
      • 'With Bewick on my knee, I was then happy'
        • Jane reads her book in silence - reader empathises with her as this is what the reader is doing
      • 'I suppose I had a species of fit: unconsciousness'
        • Jane unsure and unconscious-trustworthy narrator?
        • However, she did end the chapter here
      • "I found you full of strange contrasts. Your garb and manner were restricted by rule; your air was often diffident, and altogether that of one refined by nature..." - Rochester
        • Whilst Jane is mostly trustworthy, she is not her own psychoanalyst
        • Sometimes we need an outside perspective to understand what Jane isn't telling the reader but is influencing the novel
      • 'I stood in the position of one without a resource, without a friend, without a coin'
        • Jane describes herself as helpless and desolate
        • This humility and honesty makes Jane trustworthy to the reader

Comments

Dla2lag

A very detailed mind map that identifies the main themes; the ideas highlighted are relevant and useful and used alongside direct references to the text could be a very helpful revision tool. Use in conjunction with Themes in Jane Eyre 1.

WEHLFAIUGDRGSHER

SUCKS

baih

not gnaa lie now alright but these things are perfect an all BUT NOT PRINTABLE PROPER SMALL SO PLEASE DO SOMING ABOUT IT 

#bigthumbsup

yeah wow, true story these people are not lying so dooooooo something.....

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