the falling leaves

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  • Created by: rebecca
  • Created on: 14-05-13 17:11
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  • THE FALLING LEAVES
    • context
      • the author
        • a feminist and atheist pacifist and socialist
          • pacifist during the first world war
        • She campaigned against the policy of conscription
      • subject matter
        • woman's response
          • When it began in July 1914, the war was very popular with the British public.
            • when the falling leaves was written many thousands of soldiers were dying for the sake of a few metres territory
    • form and structure
      • form
        • alternate line lengths 6,10.6,10,6,10 (syllables)
        • strict rhyme scheme of groups of three
      • structure
        • built on a series of contrasts
          • alternate line lengths 6,10.6,10,6,10 (syllables)
          • short and long lines
          • contrast in beginning and end of poem
            • first half
              • Cole sets up gentle contrasts between the rider and the leaves, then the leaves and snowflakes.
            • second half
              • the poem is more angry, with contrasts between the poet and the dying soldiers, then the soldiers and the snowflakes.
    • LANGUAGE AND IMAGERY
      • sound
        • careful rhyme scheme
          • expresses calm control
        • first half = soft rhymes
          • first half
            • Cole sets up gentle contrasts between the rider and the leaves, then the leaves and snowflakes.
        • In the second half of the poem, however, the rhymes are stronger and the sounds more aggressive.
        • final rhyme is softer but sounds like death
        • repetition of ing sound
          • continuous verbs
            • soliders continue to die while she is out for a quiet ride on a still afternoon
              • huge numbers, unseen and unheard hundreds of miles away.
      • imagery
        • line 6 contrasts imagery with total destruction
        • poet starts to use biblical imagery e.g. line 10
        • emotion is expressed using contrast
          • violent imagery
          • sad reality of what is happening
            • violent imagery
        • men are now rotting like leaves
          • sad reality of what is happening
      • attitudes themes and ideas
        • provides an interesting female point of view
          • most war poetry written by men in war
            • tends to focus on violent action or death
          • expresses feelings of someone who is not on the battlefield but still feels the loss it brings
        • contrast
          • between the quiet normal everyday life of the poet
            • collision between lives/ideas
              • tightly mirrored by tightly structured form
                • expressing outward calm and inner turmoil
                  • turmoil expressed through alternating line lenghts
          • violent realities of war
            • collision between lives/ideas
              • tightly mirrored by tightly structured form
                • expressing outward calm and inner turmoil
                  • turmoil expressed through alternating line lenghts
        • poet sees the war in perspecitive
          • from a distance (thousands of miles away)
          • sees thousands of bodies returning not death of an individual friend
    • When it began in July 1914, the war was very popular with the British public.
      • when the falling leaves was written many thousands of soldiers were dying for the sake of a few metres territory

    Comments

    Paul Dutton


    A great mind map, colour coded, plenty of useful information.

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