reasons for conservative dominance 1951-1964

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  • Created on: 24-05-15 16:07
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  • reasons for conservative dominance 1951-1964
    • conservative dominance across the year 1951-1964 can be attributed to a number of factors; some argue that it was due to the key personalities in the party during the period, such as Macmillan and Butler,who presented a charismatic and confident image to the public which secured votes.
      • some disagree and state that it was based on shifts in ideology and was in fact due to the conservative adherence to the post-war consensus (mixed economy, welfare state, full employment) that resonated positively with the general public allowing them to remain dominant.
        • alternately, others argue as the question states that it was Labour disunity that led to conservative dominance  as they did not present themselves as a viable alternative.
    • Key personalities
      • public naturally seek strong and confident leads, and most of all a united party. the conservatives were  the only political party at the time who presented this.
        • conservative confidence seen through Lord Woolton and Butlers lead roles in 1945 GE
        • Harold Macmillan nicknamed 'supermac' - successfully reaches goal of 300,000 new homes per year.
    • Post-war consensus
      • decisions to privatise industries shows the party's movements away from right winged policies
        • maintained a good relationship with trade unions - contrast to labour.
      • maintained a good relationship with trade unions - contrast to labour.
  • the economy
    • the economy greatly influenced the public vote as people were more interested in their own wealth and prosperity rather than the good of society- to an extent it was the age of affluence under the conservatives so there was no need to vote otherwise.
      • the main reason however, was the economy, as the 'feel good factor' from the generally thriving economy was the 'driving force' behind voters choice and therefore political party success.
        • alternately, others argue as the question states that it was Labour disunity that led to conservative dominance  as they did not present themselves as a viable alternative.
        • government manipulation of the economy - stop-go economics - lowered and rose taxes in accordance to the election dates in order to gain votes.
          • Peter Hennessy argues: the main reason for conservative dominance was the economy not labour disunity; his interpretation focuses on the significant improvement to living standards and subsequent social mobility. Hennessy's 'Golden Age' is very much based on economic indicators directly linked to society. The 'feel good factor' is evident though improved living standards and wages, economic factors are public indicators of economic growth for average citizens.
    • reasons for conservative dominance 1951-1964
      • conservative dominance across the year 1951-1964 can be attributed to a number of factors; some argue that it was due to the key personalities in the party during the period, such as Macmillan and Butler,who presented a charismatic and confident image to the public which secured votes.
        • some disagree and state that it was based on shifts in ideology and was in fact due to the conservative adherence to the post-war consensus (mixed economy, welfare state, full employment) that resonated positively with the general public allowing them to remain dominant.
        • Key personalities
          • public naturally seek strong and confident leads, and most of all a united party. the conservatives were  the only political party at the time who presented this.
            • conservative confidence seen through Lord Woolton and Butlers lead roles in 1945 GE
            • Harold Macmillan nicknamed 'supermac' - successfully reaches goal of 300,000 new homes per year.
        • Post-war consensus
          • decisions to privatise industries shows the party's movements away from right winged policies
      • adherence with postwar consensus - included Britain having a mixed economy, full employment, welfare benefits etc.
        • improvement for general workers boosting conservative popularity
      • not giving the pubic a viable alternative, therefore people continued to vote conservative which maintained their dominance through 51-64
        • Nuclear weapons disputes
        • Bevan Vs Gaitskell
        • troubles with the Trade Unions
        • Labour disunity.
        • Housing ownership
          • Property owning democracy
            • People more freely able to afford luxury good and other items such as morgages
              • men's wages went up from £8.30 in 1951 to £15.35 in 1961
              • Housing ownership
                • Property owning democracy
                  • People more freely able to afford luxury good and other items such as morgages
                    • men's wages went up from £8.30 in 1951 to £15.35 in 1961

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