GCSE psychology APD

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  • APD
    • Practical Implications
      • As researchers cannot decide on the cause of APD it is very difficult to know how to prevent and treat it.
      • If APD has a biological cause then it cannot be prevented.
      • Psychologists who believe APD has a biological cause have attempted to treat it using medication but research has found this to be ineffective.
      • If APD has a situational cause reducing childhood problems should lower the risk of APD developing.
      • Identifying risk factors for APD can lead to some groups being overlooked; e.g.. children who have a stable childhood can also develop APD.
      • APD is one of the most difficult disorders to treat, as its characteristics can make patients difficult to work with, e.g. they don't believe they need to change, or they lie about their behaviour, describing their offences as less serious than they were
    • Characteristics
      • Not following norms and laws of sociey
      • Being deceitful by lying.
      • Conning others
      • Using aliases
      • Being impulsive
      • Doesn't plan ahead
      • Irritable and aggresive
      • Being irresponsible
      • Often involved in physical fights or assaults.
      • Being careless about own safety or the safety of others
      • Fails to hold down a job or pay back money
      • Lacking remorse by being indifferent to, or finding reasons for hurting or stealing from others
    • Situational causes
      • Socioeconomic factors, e.g. low family income, poor housing.
      • Quality of home life, e.g. poor parenting.
      • Education factors, e.g. low school achievement, leaving school early
  • Practical Implications
    • As researchers cannot decide on the cause of APD it is very difficult to know how to prevent and treat it.
    • If APD has a biological cause then it cannot be prevented.
    • Psychologists who believe APD has a biological cause have attempted to treat it using medication but research has found this to be ineffective.
    • If APD has a situational cause reducing childhood problems should lower the risk of APD developing.
    • Identifying risk factors for APD can lead to some groups being overlooked; e.g.. children who have a stable childhood can also develop APD.
    • APD is one of the most difficult disorders to treat, as its characteristics can make patients difficult to work with, e.g. they don't believe they need to change, or they lie about their behaviour, describing their offences as less serious than they were

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Elfman1

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