Limiting Factors of Photosynthesis - GCSE Biology AQA

View mindmap
  • Limiting Factors
    • Winter
      • In winter, temperature is usually the limiting factor.
    • Warm & Bright
      • In warm & bright conditions, carbon dioxide concentration is usually the limiting factor.
    • Night
      • At night, light intensity is usually the limiting factor.
    • Mineral - Deficient Soil
      • If plants are grown in mineral - deficient soil / lacking minerals soil, they may not absorb enough minerals to produce lots of chlorophyll.
      • In this case, chlorophyll concentration can be the limiting factor.
    • Photosynthesis in Farming
      • An understanding of limiting factors is important for plant production in greenhouses. Farmers must evaluate the trade-off (balance) between the costs of lighting and heating, and the rate of photosynthesis that is possible.
    • Increasing Yield
      • A high rate of photosynthesis means that crops grow faster and the total yield is bigger.
      • Lighting and heating in greenhouses increase the rate of photosynthesis that is possible.
    • Cost
      • Farmers must evaluate the trade-off between the costs of lighting and heating, and the rate of photosynthesis that is possible.
      • However, if lighting and heating are very expensive, it may not be possible to spend money on increasing the light intensity and temperature of a greenhouse.
    • Uses of Glucose
      • The glucose produced by photosynthesis is mainly used for respiration in plants. However, it can also be converted into other products such as starch.
    • Starch
      • Starch is insoluble (cannot be dissolved) and is stored in stems, leaves or roots.
    • Cellulose
      • Cellulose is used to strengthen cell walls. It is particularly important for fast-growing plants.
    • Proteins
      • A source of nitrogen is also needed for glucose to be converted to protein.
      • Proteins are needed for cell growth and repair.
      • Plants get this nitrogen by absorbing nitrate ions (minerals) from soil.
    • Fats & Oils
      • Fats & oils are stored in structures such as seeds.
      • For example, sunflower seeds are a key ingredient in cooking oils.

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Biology resources:

See all Biology resources »See all Photosynthesis and transpiration resources »