glasgow babies - schaffer and emerson

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  • Procedure
    • longitudinal study
      • Carried out over long period of time
    • 60 Glasweigan babies for 18 months
    • Glasgow Babies - Schaffer & Emerson
      • Aim
      • Findings
        • Mother main attachment for 65% at 18 months old
        • Father main attachment for 3% by 18 months
        • 31% had multiple attachments by 18 months old
      • Conclusions
        • Attachments form with those that respond to baby's signals, not just those that feed and change
        • Early attachments act as template for later ones
      • Evaluation
        • Externally valid - findings can be applied to real world - help parents to understand how babies learn
        • Internally valid - found out what researchers aimed to
        • Generalisable - used babies from range of ages, but were all Glasweigan so can't be generalised to everyone (cultural bias)
        • Longitudinal stuidy makes it reliable - can be repeated by many psychologists at any time
      • Stages of attachment
        • Asocial
          • Newborn
          • No attachment to particular attachment
        • Indiscriminate attachments
          • Up to 7 months
          • Will recognise familiar people
        • Specific attachments
          • 7-11 months
          • Attach to main caregivers, wary of strangers
        • Multiple attachments
          • 11 months +
          • Attach to many different people
    • Interviewed mothers in own home to ask about infant's everyday reaction to separation
  • Stages of attachment
    • Asocial
      • Newborn
      • No attachment to particular attachment
    • Indiscriminate attachments
      • Up to 7 months
      • Will recognise familiar people
    • Specific attachments
      • 7-11 months
      • Attach to main caregivers, wary of strangers
    • Multiple attachments
      • 11 months +
      • Attach to many different people

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