Formation of relasionships

HideShow resource information
View mindmap
  • Formation of a relationship
    • Reward/need satisfactory theory
      • Byrne and core
      • People are attracted to people who are satisfying to be with
        • rewarding stimuli produces positive emotions eg Happiness
        • eg someone who makes you laugh is rewarding
          • cate et al
            • questionnaires of 337 people
              • reward level was most superior in determining satisfaction
                • Hays found that we gain satisfaction from giving as well
      • people are not attracted to people who produce punishing stimuli eg sadness
        • For example being with someone who you can not be yourself with is punishing
      • Behaviour approach
        • operant conditioning
          • we repeat behaviour that is positively reinforced and avoid behaviour that is negatively reinforced
      • Theory states that we enter a relationship with someone who creates positive feelings
      • Gucy et al
        • participant completed a task
        • the experimenter marked the task
        • the likening for the experimenter was higher when they were positively evaluated
        • lab based
      • Culture bas
        • lott
          • In some cultures the females are expected to be more focused on the needs of others
      • evolutionary theory
        • aron
          • reward system evolved to drive our ancestors to focus courtship on one individual
    • Attraction through association
      • when we meet people during positive events we association them with that positive event and think favourable of them
      • if we meet someone when we're happy then we're more likely to like them
      • behavioural approach
        • classical conditioning
          • we association the positive feelings of the event with our feelings for the individual
            • more likely to form a relationship with them
            • reductionist
    • Sociobiological theory
      • attraction is an evolutionary need
      • important that we don't mate with a weaker mate or it will be less likely that out offspring will mate and our genes will be passed on
      • we don't want to mate with someone of a higher level of attraction because they might seek a better partner
        • Bryne. clore et al
          • first people filter out those who are dissimilar
          • they then look for someone who is similar to them
            • similar people are less likely to reject them
              • condon et al
            • similar because they share the same attitudes
              • reward/need satisfaction theory
            • caspi
              • married couples who are similar tend to be more happy
            • other factors of similarities
              • eg speakman et al found similarities in physical condition eg body fat
      • Murstein
        • 200 couples
        • judges rated each of the couple individually
          • in each couple ratings were roughly equal
            • variation could be because people have a low self esteem
        • judges were subjective and may not share the same view
        • no consideration of homosexual relationships
          • reduces population validity
      • matching hypothesis
    • Filter model
      • Kerckoff and davis
      • we narrow down potential partners so small group of desirables on
        • social filter
          • people mix with people of an equal economic background
          • dates due to social mobility
        • attitudes and values filter
          • sharing of beliefs. communications and values make progress of relationship easier
      • Gruber-Baldini et al
        • longitudinal study
        • couples that are similar are more likely to be together 20 years later
      • support increases external validty
      • culture bias
        • doesn't take into account arranged marriages

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Relationships resources »