Celebrity worship

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  • Celebrity worship
    • Parasocical relasionships
      • One-sided relationships in which one person is unaware of the other
      • Schippa
        • most likely to be formed from celebrities which are attractive and similar to the viewer
    • Measuring attraction of celebrities
      • Celebrity Attitude scale
        • Devised by McCutcheon
        • 23 items on a likert scale (answers between 1-5)
      • scale has three sub scales which measure
        • The entertainment/social sub-scale
        • The intense Personal sub-scale
          • measures the intensity of someone's feelings as well as obsessional tendencies
            • eg considering them to be your soul mate
        • borderline Pathological scale
          • measures potentially harmful aspects of feelings towards the celebrity
            • eg if someone asked me to do something illegal as a favour I would
            • case study of Ian Watkins
    • levels of Para-social relasionships
      • McCutcheon et al
      • Level one
        • the entertainment social level
          • they're a source of entertainment and fun
      • level two
        • The intense personal level
          • becoming intensely engaged with celebrity
      • Level three
        • borderline pathological
          • behaviours that are seen as obsessional and pathological
    • Explanastions
      • Pathological view
        • Maltby et al
        • those who attach themselves to celebrities often have poor adjustment and mental health and may lack social skills
      • The absorption- addiction model
        • McCutcheon et al
        • people pursue parasocial relationships due to deflects or lacks within real life
          • from following a celebrity they're able to gain a sense of identity and achieve a sense of fulfilment
            • Derrick et al
              • US undergraduates
              • people with a low self-esteem experienced feeling closer to themselves and a boost of self esteem around celebrities
                • not felt in real life
        • three levels of identity
          • harmless fan stage
          • those with a weaker sense of personal identity or poorer psychological adjustment
            • go further and absorb themselves into the celebrities life
            • this can also be triggered by personal crisis
          • stalking is the third stage
            • reached by people with the poorest mental health and adjustment
        • relationship is addictive
          • constantly looking to get a stronger involvement
      • the positive/ active view
        • Jenkins and jenson
        • parasocial relationships serve important functions
          • fans take an active positive role
        • create social networks with other fans and can benefit the celebrity
          • also provide models of social behaviour and able to learn cultural values
      • Attachment theory
        • cole et al
        • people who form insecure attachments in childhood
          • more likely to form attachment with celebrities than secure attached adults
          • parasocial relationship have no demand and no risk of rejection
    • Maltby
      • correlation between celebrity worship and low body image
        • creating a dis-position for eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa
    • Evolutionary explanations
      • humans love for novelty (neophilia)
        • lead to females being more attracted to mates which displayed creativity
          • Musicians, artists and actors displayed or talents and are more attractive
            • Shiraishi  et al
              • enzyme MAOA correlated with novelty- seeking tenancies
          • Miller
            • Sexual selection favours minds prone to creativity and fantasy
      • Celebrity gossip
        • exchange of social information is adaptive
          • de backer
          • creates bonds within groups and social networks
            • celebrities provide a desired social network
          • surveyed 800 people and found that gossip was an important was of acquiring a social network

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